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Thread: Jazz Standards

  1. #2501
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    Cantaloupe Island
    by Herbie Hancock

    Herbie Hancock on piano with Freddie Hubbard on trumpet
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8B1oIXGX0Io&feature=related

    Pat Metheney guitar feature
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMxESFBS4mY

    Jean Luc Ponty and Nigel Kennedy violin duet feature
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HTftFdCVlmE

    "Cantaloupe Island" is a jazz standard composed by Herbie Hancock. It was first recorded on his 1964 album Empyrean Isles. It was one of the first examples of a modal jazz composition set to a funky beat.[citation needed]
    It was sampled by the group Us3 on their song "Cantaloop (Flip Fantasia)", and furthermore has been used as bumper music (or button) on National Public Radio. Versions have been recorded by many artists, including Pat Metheny, Jean-Luc Ponty, Tanghetto, Jack DeJohnette and Milton Nascimento and TheBigMasterFunk. Yonderboi has a (short) cover version of this song.
    "Cantaloupe Island" was recently named #19 in the Jazz24.org list of 100 quintessential jazz songs of all time. http://www.jazz24.org/jazz100.html
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    Nice one, Whitey
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    Watermelon Man
    By Herbie Hancock, 1962

    Herbie Hancock's original recording with Freddie Hubbard and Dexter Gordon
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4z8Rt4nvd-I

    Mongo Santamaria
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3RtBOHWaAo

    Jon Hendricks' vocal version with the lyrics he wrote
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1paLa5CVs8

    Herbie Hancock's Updated version in 1973
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jo5GcYeh7XA&feature=related



    "Watermelon Man" is a jazz standard written by Herbie Hancock, first released on his debut album, Takin' Off (1962), in a grooving hard bop version that featured improvisations by Freddie Hubbard and Dexter Gordon.[1] A single of the tune reached the Top 100 of the pop charts. Cuban percussionist Mongo Santamaría released the tune as a Latin pop single the next year on Battle Records, where it became a surprise hit, reaching #10 on the pop charts.[2] Santamaría's recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1998. Hancock radically re-worked the tune, combining elements of funk, for the album Head Hunters (1973).[1]

    Takin' Off

    Hancock wrote the piece to help sell his debut album as a leader, Takin' Off (1962), on Blue Note Records; it was the first piece of music he had ever composed with a commercial goal in mind. The popularity of the piece, due primarily to Mongo Santamaría, paid Hancock's bills for five or six years. Hancock did not feel the composition was a sellout however, describing that structurally, it was one of his strongest pieces due to its almost mathematical balance.[3] The form is a sixteen bar blues. Recalling the piece, Hancock said, "I remember the cry of the watermelon man making the rounds through the back streets and alleys of Chicago. The wheels of his wagon beat out the rhythm on the cobblestones."[4] The tune, based on a bluesy piano riff, drew on elements of R&B, soul jazz and bebop, all combined into a pop hook.[5] Hancock joined bassist Butch Warren and drummer Billy Higgins in the rhythm section, with Freddie Hubbard on trumpet and Dexter Gordon on tenor saxophone.[5] Hancock's chordal work draws from the gospel tradition, while he builds his solo on repeated riffs and trilled figures.[6]
    Mongo Santamaría

    Hancock filled in for pianist Chick Corea in Mongo Santamaría's band one weekend at a nightclub in The Bronx when Corea gave notice that he was leaving. Hancock played the tune for Santamaría at friend Donald Byrd's urging. Santamaría started accompanying him on his congas, then his band joined in, and the small audience slowly got up from their tables and started dancing, laughing and having a great time. Santamaría later asked Hancock if he could record the tune. Santamaría recorded a three minute version, suitable for radio, where he joined timbalero Francisco "Kako" Baster in a cha-cha beat, while drummer Ray Lucas performed a backbeat.[7] Santamaría included the track on his album Watermelon Man (1962). Santamaría's recording is sometimes considered the beginning of Latin boogaloo, a fusion of Afro-Cuban rhythms with those of R&B.[8]
    Head Hunters

    Hancock re-recorded the tune for Head Hunters (1973), combining synthesizers with a Sly Stone and James Brownfunk influence,[9] adding an eight-bar section. Hancock described his composition "Chameleon", also from Head Hunters, to Down Beat magazine in 1979: "In the popular forms of funk, which I've been trying to get into, the attention is on the rhythmic interplay between different instruments. The part the Clavinet plays has to fit with the part the drums play and the line the bass plays and the line that the guitar plays. It's almost like African drummers where seven drummers play different parts"; "Watermelon Man" shares a similar construction.[10] A live version was released on the double LP Flood (1975), recorded in Japan.
    On the intro and outro of the tune, percussionist Bill Summers blows into a beer bottle imitating hindewhu, a style of singing/whistle-playing found in Pygmy music of Central Africa. Hancock and Summers were struck by the sound, which they heard on the ethnomusicology LP, The Music of the Ba-Benzélé Pygmies (1966), by Simha Arom and Genviève Taurelle.[11]
    Other versions

    The tune is a jazz standard and has been recorded over two hundred times.[4] Jazz lyricist Jon Hendricks set words to the composition and recorded it on Jon Hendricks Recorded in Person at the Trident (1963). Hendricks was a prominent practitioner of the technique of creating lyrics for jazz instrumental themes called vocalese. Hendrick's version was also cut by Manfred Mann to be released on the UK hit EP, The One in the Middle and on the US release of their album The Five Faces of Manfred Mann (1965). In 1964, the composition was covered by Bill Haley & His Comets for the Orfeon Records label; it was retitled "Surf de la Sandía".[citation needed] Jazz singer-songwriterGloria Lynne added lyrics to the tune with Hancock's permission.[12] The tune was also covered in 1972, by The J.B.'s, James Brown's backing band at the time. ATA Airlines have used the tune as their "theme song" since the early 1990s.
    Hancock's Head Hunters recording has been sampled numerous times in pop music, including the songs: "1-900-LL-Cool-J", from Walking with a Panther (1989) by LL Cool J,[13] "Open Your Eyes", from Organized Konfusion (1991) by Organized Konfusion,[13] "Smoke Some Kill", from Smoke Some Kill (198 by Schoolly D,[13] "Sanctuary", from Bedtime Stories (1994) by Madonna and "Pocket Full of Furl", from "Uptown 4 Life" (1996) by U.N.L.V..[14]
    In 2003, jazz fusion\contemporary jazz pianist David Benoit covered the song from his album "Right Here, Right Now."[15][16]
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  4. #2504
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    Now there, Whitey, is one I do not particularly like. I've heard many versions, and it just does not grab me.

    One out of 100s, though----still a great job!
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  5. #2505
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    You can't personally like every jazz standard. But, for it to have become a standard, many people must have liked it over the years.
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  6. #2506
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    Chameleon
    By Herbie Hancock, 1973

    Herbie Hancock
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFvxtiU2SJk&feature=related

    Buddy Rich
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMOtMeOGcc8

    Maynard Ferguson
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9SYDO3YE2AI


    "Chameleon" is a jazz standard composed by Herbie Hancock in collaboration with Bennie Maupin, Paul Jackson and Harvey Mason, all of whom also performed the original 15′44″ version on the 1973 landmark album Head Hunters featuring solos by Hancock and Maupin. The song has a characteristic bass line and is set to a funky beat. Another notable aspect of the song is that it is built entirely on a two-chord vamp (B♭m7 and E♭7 - a common progression in modern music). The piece has been covered by many notable artists, including Maceo Parker, Buddy Rich, Maynard Ferguson, Eddie Jefferson, Gov't Mule, Michał Urbaniak, String Cheese Incident, Umphrey's McGee, and James Morrison.

    The notable funky bass line is often mistaken for a bass but was actually played by Hancock on an ARP Odyssey.


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    Rockit
    By Herbie Hancock

    Herbie Hancock
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpvW356BPpU



    "Rockit" is a song recorded by Herbie Hancock. It was released as a single from his 1983 album Future Shock. The song was written by Hancock, bass guitaristBill Laswell and synthesizer/drum machine programmer Michael Beinhorn.
    Constructed and composed during the recording process at various studios, including Martin Bisi's in Brooklyn NY, "Rockit" was perhaps the first popular single to feature scratching and other turntablist techniques, performed by GrandMixer D.ST - an influential DJ in the early years of turntablism - using turntables as a musical instrument. Later turntablists, such as DJ Qbert and Mix Master Mike, cited "Rockit" as revelatory in the documentary film Scratch, inspiring their interest in the instrument. The record GrandMixer D.ST. used for scratching in Rockit was the B-side of Change The Beat by Fab Five Freddy, released in 1982 on Celluloid Records.
    The single was a major radio hit in the United Kingdom and a popular dance club song in the United States. The music video, directed by duo Godley & Creme[1] and featuring robot-like sculptures (by Jim Whiting) moving in time to the music, was among the earliest videos to feature African Americans on MTV[original research?] and garnered five MTV Video Music Awards in 1984, including Best Concept Video and Best Special Effects. Hancock himself appears and plays keyboard only as an image on a television, which is smashed on the pavement in the closing shot.

    Appearances in other media


    • The song is featured in the 2007 film Kickin' It Old Skool as the song being played during two breakdance competitions, and a song that wakes the main character Justin, played by Jamie Kennedy, from his 20 year coma.

    • The song appears in the film Zoolander, where it is used to break Derek's conditioning during the finale catwalk scene.
    It was also used for "Showboat" on Soccer AM.
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  8. #2508
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    I Thought It Was You
    Herbie Hancock

    Herbie Hancock, vocoder voice
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2q25nUY3iEE&feature=related

    Kimiko Kasai vocal with Herbie Hancock
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyiGi-6ZXdQ&feature=related

    From 1978-1982, Hancock recorded many albums consisting of jazz-inflected disco and pop music, beginning with Sunlight (featuring guest musicians like Tony Williams and Jaco Pastorius on the last track) (197. Singing through a vocoder, he earned a British hit,[9] "I Thought It Was You", although critics were unimpressed.[10] This led to more vocoder on the 1979 follow-up, Feets, Don't Fail Me Now, which gave him another UK hit in "You Bet Your Love".[9] Albums such as Monster (1980), Magic Windows (1981), and Lite Me Up (1982) were some of Hancock's most criticized and unwelcomed albums, the market at the time being somewhat saturated with similar pop-jazz hybrids from the likes of former bandmate Freddie Hubbard. Hancock himself had quite a limited role in some of those albums, leaving singing, composing and even producing to others
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    Butterfly
    written by Herbie Hancock

    Herbie Hancock Thrust album
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3E9Aa4VSnQ

    Herbie Hancock with vocal by Kimiko Kasai
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZ3jvv6pBhQ

    Gretchen Parlato vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmYRllome8Q&feature=related


    Herbie Hancock, 1994, from album "Dis Is Da Drum"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuOMr_ZODbU&feature=related


    Thrust is a jazz fusion album by Herbie Hancock, released in 1974 on Columbia Records. It served as a follow-up to Hancock's album, Head Hunters (1973), and achieved similar commercial success, as the album reached as high as number 13 on the Billboard Hot 200 listing. The lineup for Thrust is the same as on Head Hunters, except Mike Clark replaced Harvey Mason on drums. This is his thirteenth album overall.
    The composition "Actual Proof" was originally written for the film The Spook Who Sat By the Door, and Hancock has used it as a demonstration of his style of playing the Fender Rhodes piano.[1]
    The composition "Butterfly" would subsequently be performed on the live album, Flood, and two more studio releases: Direct Step and Dis Is Da Drum.
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    Love this thread Whitey! Years of cocktail waitressing in swanky bars stamped this music on my soul
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    Inutil Pasagem
    bossa nova standard by Carlos Jobim

    Gretchen Parlato vocal duet with Esperanza Spalding (2011 Grammy for best new artist) and her double bass accompaniement
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qq3umxVdq_s&feature=related

    "Inútil Paisagem" ("Useless Landscape") is a song composed by Antonio Carlos Jobim, with lyrics by Aloysio de Oliveria. An English-language version with lyrics by Ray Gilbert is titled "If You Never Come to Me".
    Notable Recordings

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  12. #2512
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lickable View Post
    Love this thread Whitey! Years of cocktail waitressing in swanky bars stamped this music on my soul

    Thanks Lickable! Yes, the music grows on a person the more they listen to it.
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    Love For Sale
    by Cole Porter


    Eartha Kitt vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNvGVVqRJEs

    Dexter Gordon Sax Feature
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkD15hosSh0&feature=related

    Buddy Rich Big Band
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBwigXsYA3I&feature=related


    Ella Fitzgerald vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ll1Z-Z9anpU

    Cannonball Adderley quintet
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tSYXpq2kW0&feature=related




    "Love for Sale" is a song by Cole Porter, from the musical The New Yorkers which opened on Broadway on December 8, 1930 and closed in May 1931 after 168 performances. The song is written from the viewpoint of a prostitute advertising various kinds of "love for sale": "Old love, new love, every love but true love".
    The song's chorus, like many in the Great American Songbook, is written in the A-A-B-A format. However, instead of 32 bars, it's 64, plus an 8-bar tag. The tag is often dropped when the song is performed. The tune, using what is practically a trademark for Porter, shifts between a major and minor feeling.
    "Love for Sale" was originally considered in bad taste, even scandalous. In the initial Broadway production, it was performed by Kathryn Crawford, portraying a streetwalker, with three girlfriends (Waring's Three Girl Friends) as back-up singers, in front of Reuben's, a popular restaurant of the time. As a response to the criticism, the song was transferred from the white Crawford to the African American singer Elisabeth Welch, who sang with back-up singers in a scene set in front of Harlem's Cotton Club.
    Despite the fact the song was banned from radio airplay, or perhaps because of it, it became a hit, with Libby Holman's version going to #5 and the "Fred Waring's Pennsylvanians" version going to #14, both in 1931. (All other 1931 recordings of the song were as an instrumental.)
    Notable recordings since include Hal Kemp in 1939, Billie Holiday in 1945, Eartha Kitt in the 1950s, Ella Fitzgerald in 1956, and again in 1972 on her Ella Loves Cole album, Tony Bennett in 1957, Miles Davis and Cannonball Adderley for 1958 Miles, Dexter Gordon in 1962, The Manhattan Transfer in 1976, the German disco group Boney M in 1977, Donald Byrd on the Love Byrd album in 1981, Elvis Costello live on the remastered Rhino Entertainment CD of his 1981 record Trust. Harvey Fierstein performs a memorable (if interrupted) version in the movie version of his play Torch Song Trilogy. Simply Red led by Mick Hucknall sang this song at the Montreux Jazz Festival in 1992. Harry Connick, Jr. covered it in 1999 on his album Come by Me. Amanda Lear recorded a version in 2006.
    Other vocal versions include Mel Torme's, Dinah Washington's, Diane Schuur's, Dianne Reeves', and Fine Young Cannibals'. The song has become a jazz standard, and is often performed in solely instrumentalist versions. Notable among these is the Arthur Lyman version, which revived the song as a single record in 1963.
    The song was also performed during a sequence in a gay night club in the Cole Porter biopic De-Lovely (performed by Vivian Green) and during a similar sequence in Brian De Palma's The Black Dahlia. A recording by Julie London featured in the film "Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room" (2005).
    Another notable recording of "Love for Sale" was made by Keely Smith at Capitol Studios, LA, for Concord Records in July 2002.[1]
    There is another significant recording of "Love for Sale" by Weldon "Jack" Teagarden in 1940. The vocalist was 18 year old Kitty Kallen and, like the other versions of the song, was banned from radio.
    Brazilian singer Zizi Possi recorded her own rendition for her album Para Inglês Ver... E Ouvir. Her rendition was picked as part of soap opera Belíssima soundtrack in 2006.
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    Love For Sale (continued)

    Libby Holman's Hit Version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FiBvltpuzU
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    Night and Day
    by Cole Porter

    Fred Astaire sings to Ginger Rogers in the move "The Gay Divorcee"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YV5e7mWcQJE

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEM_63_P0CY

    Frank Sinatra, 1962 version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i58SrYULhvE&feature=related

    Art Tatum's piano with Roy Eldridge's trumpeting
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCW5YQiXhhw

    The Temptations vesion
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gytmVi-Wh5w

    Stan Getz (tenor sax) and Bill Evans (piano) latin version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ChrMbTEuDDs

    "Night and Day" is a popular song by Cole Porter. It was written for the 1932 musical play Gay Divorce. It is perhaps Porter's most popular contribution to the Great American Songbook and has been recorded by dozens of artists.
    Fred Astaire introduced "Night and Day" on stage, and his recording of the song was a #1 hit. He performed it again in the 1934 film version of the show, renamed The Gay Divorcee, and it became one of his signature pieces.
    Porter was known to claim that the Islamic call to worship he heard on a trip to Morocco inspired the song.[1] Another popular legend has it he was inspired by the Moorish architecture of the Alcazar Hotel in Cleveland Heights, Ohio.[2]
    The song was so associated with Porter that when Hollywood first filmed his life story in 1946, the movie was entitled Night and Day.

    Notable recordings
    "Night and Day" has been recorded many times, notably by Bill Evans, Art Tatum, Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Dionne Warwick, Ella Fitzgerald, Shirley Bassey, Ringo Starr, Sondre Lerche, Doris Day, Deanna Durbin, Jamie Cullum, and U2.
    Sinatra recorded the song over five times including: with Axel Stordahl in his first solo session in 1942 and again with him in 1947; with Nelson Riddle in 1956 for A Swingin' Affair!, with Don Costa in 1961 for Sinatra and Strings, and even a disco version with Joe Beck in 1977.
    Dionne Warwick recorded it for her 1990 album Dionne Warwick Sings Cole Porter.
    Shirley Bassey recorded it for her 1959 album The Bewitching Miss Bassey.
    Doris Day recorded it for her 1958 album Hooray for Hollywood.
    Fitzgerald's most celebrated recording of the song occurred on her 1956 album Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Cole Porter Songbook.
    Everything But the Girl chose this song for their first single in 1983.
    The song was recorded by Ringo Starr in 1970 for his first solo album Sentimental Journey. It was then recorded in 1982 as a one-off collaboration between Tracey Thorn with student friend Ben Watt as Everything But The Girl; subsequently the duo became a well-established pop act.
    The rock/jam band Phish has played the song live only once in their 20 plus year career: at a private wedding on August 12, 1989.
    The song was recorded by U2 in 1990 and appeared on the Red Hot + Blue compilation album. Thomas Anders (of Modern Talking fame) recorded his version in 1997 on the album Live Concert. Chicago added a version in 1995 on their return-to-their-roots-disc, Night & Day: Big Band; Rod Stewart recorded a version for his 2004 album Stardust: the Great American Songbook 3. A rendition was also recorded by The Temptations, which was featured on the soundtrack of the 2000 movie What Women Want.
    "Night and Day" also reappeared on the American pop charts in 1967, done by Sérgio Mendes and Brasil '66.
    In 2004 a version of "Night and Day" was included in the biographical film about Cole Porter, De-Lovely, sung by John Barrowman and Kevin Kline. The song was also recorded in 2005 by Sondre Lerche on his album Duper Sessions. In 2007 it was recorded by Bebel Gilberto with a bossa nova approach on her album Memento.
    Allan Sherman's 1965 album Allan in Wonderland included a version, with Porter's music and words unchanged, but "With Punctuation Marks Included, so it starts like this:
    Night and Day, comma,You are the one--dash;Only you comma beneath the moon comma and under the sun semicolonVictor Borge was better known for verbal punctuation than was Sherman, but in the case of this song, Borge would start playing Beethoven's "Moonlight Sonata" op. 27, with its opening left-hand octave, and then would begin playing the three right-hand notes, seguéing into the beginning of "Night and Day".
    Little River Band references the song in their song Reminiscing. One line of the song states "And the Porter tune/Made us dance across the room", while in the background the backup singers sing the words "Night and Day".
    Song structure

    The construction of "Night And Day" is unusual for a hit song of the 1930s. Most popular tunes then featured 32-bar choruses, divided into four 8-bar sections, usually with an AABA musical structure, the B section representing the bridge.
    Porter's song, on the other hand, has a chorus of 48 bars, divided into 6 sections of 8 bars — ABABCB — with section C representing the bridge.
    Harmonic structure

    "Night And Day" has unusual chord changes (the underlying harmony).
    The tune begins with a pedal (repeated) dominant with a major seventh chord built on the flattened sixth of the key, which then resolves to the dominant seventh in the next bar. If performed in the key of B, the first chord is therefore G major seventh, with an F (the major seventh above the harmonic root) in the melody, before resolving to F7 and eventually B maj7.
    This section repeats and is followed by a descending harmonic sequence starting with a -75 (half diminished seventh chord or Ø) built on the augmented fourth of the key, and descending by semitones — with changes in the chord quality— to the supertonic minor seventh which forms the beginning of a more standard II-V-I progression. In B, this sequence begins with an EØ, followed by an E-7, D-7 and D dim, before resolving onto C-7 (the supertonic minor seventh) and cadencing onto B.
    The bridge is also unusual, with an immediate, fleeting and often (depending on the version) unprepared key change up a minor third, before an equally transient and unexpected return to the key centre. In B, the bridge begins with a D major seventh, then moves back to B with a B major seventh chord. This repeats, and is followed by a recapitulation of the second section outlined above.
    The vocal verse is also unusual in that most of the melody consists entirely of a single note — the same dominant pedal that begins the body of the song — with rather inconclusive and unusual harmonies underneath.
    Some have seen the use of repeated notes in the verse as an indication of the singer's obsession.
    In popular culture

    • This song was mentioned in Stephen King's short story "1408".
    • This song is also featured in the video game Bioshock.
    • This song is also featured in an episode of The Cosby Show, season 2, episode 3.
    Last edited by Whitey44; 05-14-2011 at 10:20 PM.
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    Let's Do It
    by Cole Porter

    Billie Holiday
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pgxldGTUgCM


    Eartha Kitt sexy vocal video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-oEA1sK374

    Louis Armstrong
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6_awMJOgBw

    Sam Lanin vocal with Orchestra, 1928
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RYa5Ja73sjc

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RqVRrC9BQB4&feature=fvsr

    Alanis Morrisette from Cole Porter bio Movie "De-Lovely"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElPKuJGWjjQ

    "Let's Do It, Let's Fall in Love" (also known as "Let's Do It (Let's Fall in Love)" or simply "Let's Do It") is a popular song written in 1928 by Cole Porter. It was introduced in Porter's first Broadway success, the musical Paris (192 by French chanteuse Irène Bordoni for whom Porter had written the musical as a starring vehicle. Bordoni's husband and Paris producer Ray Goetz having convinced Porter to give Broadway another try with this show. The song was later used in the English production of Wake Up and Dream (1929). In 1960 it was also included in the film version of Cole Porter's Can-Can.
    The first of Porter's famous "list songs", it features a string of suggestive and droll comparisons and examples, preposterous pairings and double-entendres, dropping famous names and events, drawing unexpectedly from highbrow and popular culture. Porter was a strong admirer of the Savoy Opera work of Sir Arthur Sullivan and W.S. Gilbert, many of whose stage works featured similar comic list songs.
    The first refrain covers humanethnic groups, the second refrain birds, the third refrain marine life, the fourth refrain insects (plus centipedes) and the fifth refrain non-human mammals.
    The phrase Let's do "it" is actually a euphemistic reference to a proposition for sexual intercourse. Several of the more suggestive lines in this regard include a couplet from verse 4: "Moths in your rugs do it, What's the use of moth-balls?" and "Folks in Siam do it, Think of Siamese twins" (verse 1) and "Why ask if shad do it? Waiter, bring me shad roe" (verse 3) and "Sweet guinea-pigs do it, Buy a couple and wait" (verse 5). There's also a report that Porter's original version included the even more risqué line, "Roosters with a doodle and a cock do it." If true, this was probably replaced by one of the lines in the verse 2 couplet "Penguins in flocks, on the rocks, do it, Even little cuckoos, in their clocks, do it."
    The nature of the song, "Let's Fall in Love," is such that it has lent itself over the years to the regular addition of contemporary or topical stanzas. For example, in 1955 the line "Even Liberace, we assume, does it" was added by Noël Coward in his cabaret performance of the song.
    The song has been revived many times since 1928, although usually with only a limited portion of the original lyrics. A punk rock version performed by Joan Jett and Paul Westerberg was used as the theme song in the 1995 movie Tank Girl, and later in a more classical version in a musical revue number within the film. In the revue, the song is at first performed by stage actress Ann Magnuson, but is taken over by star Lori Petty after she places duct tape over Magnuson's mouth. It was originally recorded with Joan Jett and Greg Graffin, but Atlantic Records didn't want them using Greg so they deleted his voice and recorded Paul's. Joan Jett and Greg Graffin's version of "Let's Do It" was eventually released in 2000 on the compilation CD Laguna Tunes (Blackheart Records).
    The White Stripes' song, "Forever For Her (Is Over For Me)" from their 2005 album Get Behind Me Satan borrows lyrics and themes from this song:
    "So let's do it, just get on a plane and just do it // Like the birds and the bees and get to it"
    Brazilian singers Chico Buarque and Elza Soares recorded a great Portuguese adaptation by Carlos Rennó, "Façamos - Vamos Amar" on Buarque's 2002 album "Duetos". It adds even more nations, animals and groups.
    Porter's original opening line for the chorus was:
    And that's why
    Chinks do it, Japs do it
    And this line can be heard in several early recordings of the song. Examples include a recording made by Dorsey Brothers & their Orchestra (featuring a vocal by a young Bing Crosby), Rudy Vallée, both in 1928, and a version of the song by the singer and well-known broadway star Mary Martin (with Ray Sinatra's orchestra), recorded in 1944. Another recording that includes the offensive opening line is one that was done by Billie Holiday, also in the 1940s.
    The above referenced original opening stanza of the chorus were changed to the now much better known refrain: "Birds do it, Bees do it" by Cole Porter when he realized that the line was offensive.[1]
    Notable recordings

    Last edited by Whitey44; 05-15-2011 at 03:05 PM.
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    The last three are absolute gems, Whitey!
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    Begin The Beguine
    by Cole Porter

    Artie Shaw's instrumental version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yuPJTA0USI&feature=fvst

    Bing Crosby vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=exkM4SSnFJc&feature=related

    Django Rheinhardt on lead guitar and Stephanie Grappelli on violin
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufGmLSm5-qg

    Ella Fitzgerald vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUyYQbgmhJk&feature=related

    Sheryl Crow, from De-Lovely
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqbe2jdF8JI

    "Begin the Beguine" is a song written by Cole Porter (1891–1964). Porter composed the song at the piano in the bar of the Ritz Hotel in Paris. In October 1935, it was introduced by June Knight in the Broadway musical Jubilee produced at the Imperial Theatre in New York City.

    Music
    The beguine music form comes from Martinique where in local Creole Beke or Begue means a White person. Beguine is the female form of "Begue". It is a combination of Latin and French dance which became popularized in Martinique and later in Paris. A beguine is a spirited ballroom dance.
    Based on the title dance, the song is notable for its 108-measure length, departing drastically from the conventional thirty-two-bar form. Where a typical "standard" popular song of its time was written in a fairly strict 32-measure form consisting of two or three eight-measure subjects generally arranged in the form A-A-B-A or A-B-A-C, "Begin the Beguine" employs the form A-A-B-A-C1-C2 with each phrase being sixteen measures in length rather than the usual eight. The final "C2" section is stretched beyond its 16 measures an additional twelve bars for a total of 28 measures, with the twelve additional measures providing a sense of finality to the long form.
    The slight differences in each of the "A" sections, along with the song's long phrases and final elongated "C2" section at the end, give it unique character and complexity. The fact that the song's individual parts hold up melodically and harmonically over such a long form also attests to Porter's talent and ability as a songwriter.
    Porter reportedly once said of the song, "I can never remember it — if I want to play I need to see the music in front of me!"[citation needed] Alec Wilder described it in his book American Popular Song: The Great Innovators 1900-1950 as "a maverick, an unprecedented experiment and one which, to this day, after hearing it hundreds of times, I cannot sing or whistle or play from start to finish without the printed music".[1]
    Artie Shaw version

    At first, the song gained little popularity, perhaps because of its length and unconventional form (thirty-two-bars). Josephine Baker danced to it in her return to America in the 1936 Ziegfeld Follies, but neither she nor the song were successful. Two years later, however, bandleader Artie Shaw wrote an arrangement of the song in collaboration with his right-hand arranger and orchestratorJerry Gray.
    After signing a new recording contract with RCA Victor records in the summer of 1938, Shaw called up "Beguine" to be the first of six tunes he would record at his initial recording session on July 24. Until then Shaw's band had been having a tough time finding an identity and maintaining its existence without having had any popular hits of significance; his previous recording contract with Brunswick had lapsed at the end of 1937 without being renewed.
    RCA's pessimism with the whole idea of recording the long tune "that nobody could remember from beginning to end anyway" sealed its fate as being released on the "B" side of the record it appeared on (Artie Shaw and His Orchestra issued by Bluebird Records as catalog number B-7746 B). Shaw's persistence paid off, though, when "Begin the Beguine" became a best-selling record in 1938. Despite Shaw's earlier obscurity, the release of his recording of "Beguine" skyrocketed Shaw and his band to fame and popularity. The recording, indeed, became one of the most famous and popular anthems of the entire Swing Era.
    Subsequent re-releases by RCA Victor (catalog number 20-1551[2]) and other releases on LPs, tapes and CDs have kept the recording readily available continuously ever since its initial release.
    Later on, when composer Cole Porter met the by-then famous bandleader, he jokingly remarked to Shaw, "I'm glad to finally meet my collaborator." Shaw reportedly replied, "Does this mean I get half of the royalties?"[citation needed]
    Uses in films

    • Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell danced to an instrumental version in Broadway Melody of 1940.
    • Deanna Durbin sang it in the film Hers to Hold (1943).
    • In the 1946 movie Night and Day, the Latin singer Carlos Ramirez performed this song.
    • "Begin the Beguine" was referenced in the 1968 animated movie Yellow Submarine in a conversation between the characters John and Jeremy.
    • Begin the Beguine was the chosen English title for Volver a Empezar (José Luis Garci, 1982), the first Spanish film that won a Hollywood Academy Award for a foreign language movie. Garci includes another tribute to Cole Porter in another of his films, You're the One (2000).
    • "Begin the Beguine" is referenced in the movie The Worst Witch, during the song "Anything Can Happen on Halloween" sung by Tim Curry as The Grand Wizard. (1986)
    • "Begin The Beguine" is featured in the 1989 documentary The Life And Times of Hank Greenberg, during the chapters in which Hank is drafted into the armed forces and in a part of the chapter about the relationship between Hank and his wife, Caral.
    • "Begin the Beguine" is sung by actress Melora Hardin in the South Seas Club scene in The Rocketeer (1991).
    • "Begin the Beguine" is performed by Sheryl Crow in the movie about Cole Porter, De-Lovely (2004).
    • Instrumental music played during a ballroom scene in the 2008 movie Australia includes "Begin the Beguine" performed by Australian clarinetist Andy Firth and the Ralph Pyle Big Band.
    • "Begin the Beguine" is referenced in the movie The Aristocrats as the song Susie Essman's grandmother plays every night.(2005)
    • In the film Hope and Glory, the song "Begin the Beguine" is sung by Dawn while her family is repairing windows broken during an air raid.
    • Sung by Sammy Davis Jr in Moon Over Parador
    Uses in other media

    • Elvis Presley recorded his own song in 1962 based on the Cole Porter song entitled "You'll Be Gone". Presley co-wrote the song with his bodyguard Red West and his assistant Charlie Hodge.
    • A character in Michael Ondaatje's Divisadero (2007) refers to this song several times.
    • The song is quoted musically and affectionately parodied in Noel Coward's tongue-twisting 1944 song Nina.
    • Mentioned several times in Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex. Milton Stephanides, father of the novel's main character, Cal, plays the song on his clarinet in order to woo Tessie, Cal's mother.
    • Mentioned in Jimmy Buffett's novel A Salty Piece of Land.
    • In the Little Mermaid song "Under the Sea", Sebastian the crab sings "When the sardines begin the beguines, it's music to me."
    • In the short story "Julio Iglesias" by Haruki Murakami, Iglesias' recording of the song proves to be unbearable to a group of sea turtles.
    • Tom Lehrer refers to it in his song "Alma" - "Her lovers were many and varied/From the day she began her -- beguine."
    The song is cited by name in the first episode of the BBC sitcom, Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads.
    • Fictional Medal of Honor recipient Ernie Yost sings the song in an episode of NCIS when he proclaims his love for Artie Shaw over Benny Goodman in the episode "Call of Silence".
    • In the Valentine's Day episode of the hit sitcom The Golden Girls, Julio Iglesias and Sophia (Estelle Getty) sing the first line.
    • In a sixth season The West Wing episode called "A Good Day", President Bartlet (Martin Sheen) sings part of the song while dancing in the Oval Office with the First Lady, Abby Bartlet (Stockard Channing).
    • In Episode 8 of Twin Peaks, character Leland Palmer regains consciousness after collapsing and menacingly exclaims "I feel good... Begin the beguine!".
    • On the "Chess (musical)" Concept Album in the song "Mountain Duet", the Russian sings "Get to the point, begin the beguine".
    Other recordings

    • Tony Martin[3] recorded Begin the Beguine at least twice: on March 14, 1939 for Decca Records (catalog numbers 2375a[4] and later 25018[5] in 78 rpm, 9-25018 in 45 rpm) and for RCA Victor Records in the late 1940s (catalog number 20-2814,[6] 47-322.
    • Eddie Heywood and his orchestra recorded a single version in 1944.
    • Alys Robi on 78 rpm in 1944
    • The Andrews Sisters recorded a single version in collaboration with Glenn Miller and his orchestra.
    • Jo Stafford recorded a version in the early 1950s.
    • Mario Lanza recorded a successful version in the late 1950s.
    • Liberace recorded and performed a spirited version with his brother, George Liberace, on his live television show in 1956.
    • Ella Fitzgerald recorded a version for the Cole Porter Songbook records on Verve.
    • Louis Prima and Keely Smith recorded a single version in 1961.
    • Tom Jones recorded a version in 1966, for his album From the Heart.
    • Pete Townshend recorded a version in 1970, for his album Happy Birthday.
    • Johnny Mathis recorded an eight minute long disco version in 1979, as well as a samba rendition.
    • Sammy Davis, Jr. recorded a version in 1979, for his album Hearin' is Believin'.
    • Al Sofia recorded a version in 2002 for the "Al Sofia Orchestra" demo cd
    • Julio Iglesias recorded a version in 1981, which reached number 1 in the UK - the first all Spanish song to do so.
    • Tuck Andress recorded a version in 1990, for his album Reckless Precision.
    • Michael Nesmith recorded a version in 1992, for his solo album Tropical Campfires.
    • Pearl Django recorded a gypsy jazz version in 2000, for the album Avalon.
    • Django Reinhardt recorded several times a gipsy jazz version of Begin the Beguine.
    • Les Paul recorded a jazz guitar version of the song.
    • Frank Sinatra recorded a version for "The Columbia Years (1943-1952)
    • Juan García Esquivel recorded a Lounge-music version of the tune.
    • Leslie Hutchinson recorded a version in the 1930s. In the thirties, this recording was given to Meher Baba in India, who later asked that it be played seven times at his tomb when his body would be laid to rest, which occurred a week after his death on 31 January 1969.
    • Richard Clayderman's album 'Music of love' (1984) features Begin the Beguine as track No.3
    • Charlie Parker's album "The Cole Porter Songbook"(Compact Disc, 1991 Verve 823250-2)
    • [[Five By Design’s Club Swing]]'s album and musical production features a 5-part vocal arrangement backed by the Robert Baca big band.
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    I Get A Kick Out of You
    Cole Porter

    Frank Sinatra, 1953
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRi7gKTNpEY

    Frank Sinatra, later version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ueIRPDAbPNY&feature=related

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhqJ_fK1zv8

    Peggy Lee
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9e77Gwo03W0

    Anita O'Day
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NSubQkRQISM

    "I Get a Kick Out of You" is a song by Cole Porter, originally featured in the Broadway musical Anything Goes and the movie of the same name.
    Originally sung by Ethel Merman, it has been covered by performers including Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday, Peggy Lee, Marlene Dietrich, Cesare Siepi, Dinah Washington, Bobby Short, Louis Armstrong, Erroll Garner, Ella Fitzgerald, Mary Martin, Anita O`Day, Rosemary Clooney, Margaret Whiting, Django Reinhardt, Gary Shearston, Jamie Cullum, The Living End, Dolly Parton, Dwele, Joan Morris, Shirley Bassey, The Gutter Twins and Lisa Ekdahl.
    Alterations to the song

    The lyrics were first altered shortly after being written. The last verse originally went as follows:
    I get no kick in a planeI shouldn't care for those nights in the airThat the fair Mrs. Lindbergh goes throughBut I get a kick out of you.After the Lindbergh kidnapping,[1] Porter changed the second and third lines to:
    Flying too high with some guy in the skyIs my idea of nothing to doIn the 1936 movie version, alternative lyrics in the second verse were provided to replace a reference to the drug cocaine, which were not allowed due to the Hays Code.
    The original verse goes as follows:
    Some get a kick from cocaineI'm sure that ifI took even one sniffThat would bore me terrifically, tooYet, I get a kick out of youPorter changed the first line to:
    Some like the perfume in SpainOne alternative version popularised by Alyson Ottaway changes the verse to:
    Some like the bop-type refrainI'm sure that ifI heard even one riffIt would bore me terrifically, tooYet, I get a kick out of youSinatra recorded both post-Hays versions: the first in 1953 and the second in 1962. On a recording live in Paris in 1962, Sinatra sings the altered version with the first line as Some like the perfume from Spain. Other Porter-approved substitutes include "whiff of Guerlain." All three of the above alternatives are mentioned in the liner notes to Joan Morris and William Bolcom's CD, "Night and Day," but on the recording, Morris sings the original second verse.
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    Every Time We Say Goodbye
    By Cole Porter


    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGNLLJz4Ajw
    This is from The Cole Porter song book. After Ella recorded it, Cole Porter heard it and was quoted as making the following understatement "she has good diction".

    Chet Baker
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImUB-U_QbJ4&feature=related
    Chet Baker said that he grew up just listening and singing to the standards on the radio before he ever played an instrument. When he picked up the piano and trumpet, he just knew naturally how to play the standards.

    Dinah Washington
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qinCGhYK18M&feature=fvwrel

    Ray Charles and Betty Carter
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ODC5neAXxE&feature=related


    Published by Chappell & Company, "Ev'ry Time We Say Goodbye" is a song with lyrics and music by Cole Porter. It was introduced in 1944 in Billy Rose's musical revue, Seven Lively Arts. Notable is Porter's clever use of word painting: As the lyrics "There is no love song finer / But how strange the change / From major to minor / Ev'ry time we say goodbye" are sung, the song literally changes its tonality from major to minor. The song has since become a jazz standard after gaining popularity in the late 50's and early 60's.
    Note: Many artists have replaced the apostrophe in "ev'ry" with an "e" and have combined "time" to form the more common "everytime."
    Notable recordings

    Pop Culture

    Annie Lennox sang it in Derek Jarman's film Edward II (1991) as well as on Red Hot + Blue AIDS awareness tribute album to Cole Porter.
    In Disney's re-make of The Parent Trap (1989)[1], Ray Charles's recording of it plays in the background of the scene when the English mother/wife (Natasha Richardson's character) and her daughter return to England.
    Natalie Cole sings it in the film De-Lovely (2004).
    The German rock band Blumfeld played it as the last song in each concert of their farewell tour before splitting up in 2007.
    Sideshow Bob sings the song in the Simpsons episode Krusty Gets Busted.
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    you are on a roll, Whitey!
    Visit: DANGER CAN BE SEXY;OPEN INVITATION;FILM NOIR PICS & IMAGES;SULTRY KISS;GALLERY OF PLAYBOYS;GIRLS WITH BALLS; CLASSIC COMICS BOOKS;PIN-UPS;SNEAKING IN TONGUES;34U2 ; BETTER ON VINYL;IT! THE THREAD FROM BEYOND SPACE
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    All of Me

    Billie Holliday
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujdbwEHkv1I

    Frank Sinatra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVm9q5ZRG1s

    Louis Armstrong
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFzxo-XI8As

    Lester and Young on sax and Teddy Wilson on piano
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hC2LL7aaYgY


    "All of Me" is a popular song and jazz standard written by Gerald Marks and Seymour Simons in 1931.
    First performed by Belle Baker over the radio and recorded in December 1931 by Ruth Etting[1], it has become one of the most recorded songs of its era, with notable versions by Billie Holiday, Louis Armstrong, Mildred Bailey, Benny Goodman, Teddy Wilson in 1941, The Count Basie Orchestra, Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, Dean Martin, Frank Sinatra, Frankie Laine in 1947, Della Reese, Johnnie Ray, Django Reinhardt, Erroll Garner, Willie Nelson, Jean Frye Sidwell, João Gilberto (Disse Alguém), Michael Bublé and The Rockin' Berries. In an episode of the 1970s television show Sanford and Son, Redd Foxx (joined by Scatman Crothers on guitar) sings a short but memorable version. "All of Me" is also performed in the Muppet Show episode with The Greasy Gopher singing along with a mandolin. The song is featured prominently in the 1984 Steve Martin/Lily Tomlin film of the same name.
    In more recent years, it has been recorded by Pia Zadora, Anne Murray and Jason Danieley. Also, a punk rock rendition of the song was recorded by NOFX. The song was a major hit on records by Paul Whiteman and Louis Armstrong in 1932, and was successfully revived by Johnnie Ray in 1952. Chelsea Krombach performed the song for her debut album Look for the Silver Lining. Laurence Juber has also performed and recorded this song in an all acoustic version played by him. It was featured in his album PCH in 2007. Michael Bublé has released a cover of it on his album, Crazy Love to be re-released.

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    Lil' Darlin'
    By Neal Hefti

    Count Basie Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMibKxQWRnw

    Neal Hefti Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKsKUaR0Kc4&feature=related

    Joe Pass guitar solo
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zR1bG14ipFo&feature=related

    Ray Charles band
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHZnt8S6Xzc&feature=related

    Ray Bryant
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCsEzFAFXCI

    Georgie Fame vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flTY2RxUP7c&feature=related

    Rank291
    Words and MusicNeal Hefti“Li’l Darlin’” was written in 1957 by composer/arranger/trumpeter Neal Hefti who arranged it for the Count Basie band which introduced the song. Gary Giddins, in Visions of Jazz: The First Century, says, “In the enduring ‘Li’l Darlin’,” he [Hefti] tested the band’s temporal mastery with a slow and simple theme that dies if it isn’t played at exactly the right tempo. Basie never flinched.”
    Hefti also wrote and arranged “Splanky” for the Basie band. Both songs appear on the album now called Atomic Basie. Hefti, who had previously arranged for Woody Herman also wrote “Girl Talk” with Bobby Troup and created the theme song for The Odd Couple.
    Jon Hendricks penned a lyric for “Li’l Darlin’” which Lambert, Hendricks & Ross recorded with Basie in 1958. Hendricks & Company recorded it in 1982, and vocalists Mark Murphy (1961) and Kurt Elling (2001) also recorded Hendricks’ lyric.
    In 1959 Bart Howard, who wrote “Fly Me to the Moon,” copyrighted a new lyric for the Hefti tune, calling it “Don’t Dream of Anybody But Me,” a title which often appends “Li’l Darlin’” in parentheses. Mel Torme sang this version with the Basie band on Judy Garland’s television show. Both Bobby Darin and Mabel Mercer recorded Howard’s lyric in 1960, and Ella Fitzgerald sang it on a 1971 release.
    The two lyrics vary in sentiment. Hendricks expresses security in his love relationship, saying “My li’l darlin’ only loves me.”
    Don’t need no palace paved with gold.
    Don’t need more cash than banks could hold.
    When I get to feelin’ a feelin’
    For something there ain’t too much of
    My sweet l’il darlin’ gives me her love.
    Howard’s lyric expresses insecurity in the love relationship, urging his lover to dream only of him when they’re apart:
    Though you vacation in Hawaii
    Or go to Switzerland to ski
    When you’re scanning the snow covered mountain
    Or fanning yourself by the sea
    Don’t dream of anybody but me.
    “Li’l Darlin’” is another of those songs that, without ever charting, moved right into the jazz lexicon and became a favorite of instrumentalists--especially guitarists, among them Charlie Byrd, Howard Alden, George Van Eps, Martin Taylor, Howard Roberts, Joe Pass, George Benson, Tal Farlow, Barney Kessel, and Kenny Burrell. It’s also been covered by pianists Ray Bryant, Monty Alexander, and Oscar Peterson with Coleman Hawkins; organists Jimmy Smith and Jimmy McGriff; the big band of Frank Capp; bassist Ray Brown; trombonists Kai Winding and Al Grey; saxophonists Frank Wess and Johnny Hodges; vibist Milt Jackson; and trumpeters Jon Faddis and Warren Vache.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whitey44 View Post
    Love For Sale
    by Cole Porter


    .

    Here is a nice updated soulful version of Love for Sale...

    Ernestine Anderson vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2p9gRRPBrwg&feature=related
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    Someday My Prince will Come

    Ernestine Anderson vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9xlFFBxWQFw&feature=related

    Ernestine moved to europe in the 1960's because rock and roll became more popular in the USA than jazz.
    Since then, she has returned to the USA and resides in Seattle.

    Last edited by Whitey44; 05-22-2011 at 07:31 AM.
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    All Blues
    music by Miles Davis
    lyrics by Oscar Brown Jr.


    Ernestine Anderson vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f77DV_qmOOU&feature=related
    Last edited by Whitey44; 05-22-2011 at 04:20 PM.
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    Going to Chicago Blues

    Jimmy Rushing vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4wV5Um1wDG0

    Ernestine Anderson vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sz3evR8YpEo&feature=related

    Joe Williams vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPcHVqKHkKo

    Lambert, Hendricks, and Ross vocal with Count Basie Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFFygzwvsig

    Doc Watson acoustic guitar and vocal
    http://new.music.yahoo.com/doc-watson/tracks/going-to-chicago-blues--2100064
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    It Was A Lover and His Lass
    music by Earnest Moeran
    words by William Shakespere

    Martha Tilton's swinging vocal from 1943
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z7qFprKkTJQ

    It was a lover and his lass,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    That o’er the green corn-field did pass
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
    When birds do sing, Hey ding a ding, ding:
    Sweet lovers love the spring.

    Between the acres of the rye,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    These pretty country folks would lie,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
    When birds do sing, Hey ding a ding, ding:
    Sweet lovers love the spring.

    This carol they began that hour,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    How that a life was but a flower,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
    When birds do sing, Hey ding a ding, ding:
    Sweet lovers love the spring.

    And therefore take the present time,
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    For love is crowned with the prime
    With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
    In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
    When birds do sing, Hey ding a ding, ding:
    Sweet lovers love the spring.
    Last edited by Whitey44; 05-24-2011 at 03:38 AM.
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    Thanks, Whitey!
    Visit: DANGER CAN BE SEXY;OPEN INVITATION;FILM NOIR PICS & IMAGES;SULTRY KISS;GALLERY OF PLAYBOYS;GIRLS WITH BALLS; CLASSIC COMICS BOOKS;PIN-UPS;SNEAKING IN TONGUES;34U2 ; BETTER ON VINYL;IT! THE THREAD FROM BEYOND SPACE
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    The Nearness of You
    music by Hoagy Carmichael
    lyrics by Ned Washington

    Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BEdhPfs8--Q

    Glen Miller Orchestra instrumental from 1938
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JqIFnJ0UipU

    Nancy Wilson vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLzcijimwas&playnext=1&list=PLFBC1034B08130EE8
    Frank Sinatra vocal, 1947
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyT1QRwagSE&feature=fvst

    Barbara Streissand
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4CPynYw96c&feature=fvwrel

    Norah Jones vocal with self accopaniement on piano from 2002
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8We0SwZHd9A&feature=related

    Sheena Easton soundtrack from the movie "Indecent Proposal"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yG9JlxZCgJA

    "The Nearness of You" is a popularsong, written in 1938 by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics by Ned Washington.
    The biggest selling 1938 version was recorded by the Glenn Miller Orchestra, with a vocal by Ray Eberle (Bluebirdcatalog number 10745)[1][2]. This recording first reached the Billboard magazine Best Seller chart on July 20, 1940 (though this is misleading, as this was Billboard's first chart) and lasted 8 weeks on the chart, peaking at #5.[3] Other popular contemporary versions were recorded by Kay Kyser's orchestra (vocal: Harry Babbitt, Columbia catalog number 3548[1][4], by Dinah Shore with Paul Weston's orchestra (Bluebird catalog number 10793)[1][2], and by Eddy Howard with Lou Adrian's orchestra (Columbia catalog number 35511)[1][5].
    The song was featured in the Paramount film Romance in the Dark released in 1938. Starring John Barrymore and John Boles it was sung by the lead actress Gladys Swarthout of Metropolitan Opera fame.
    The song was performed by Norah Jones on her album Come Away With Me. It was also performed by Diana Krall on a Geoff Keezer album, Turn Up the Quiet. Sheena Easton released her version from her standards album in 1993 No Strings and for the soundtrack of "Indecent Proposal"
    Jonathan Frakes[1] performed the song on trombone in "11001001," the 15th episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation in 1988 while in a holographic simulation of a 1958 New Orleans bar.
    A well-known bootleg recording exists featuring the Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards performing a solo version, accompanying himself on piano. Richards performed the song live during the Stones' 2002-2003 Licks Tour. A performance was captured and released on the 2004 live album Live Licks.
    [edit] Recorded versions


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    Georgia On My Mind
    music by Hoagy Carmichael
    words by Stuart Gorrell

    Hoagy Carmichael Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSKfkJUKbOc

    Louis Armstrong
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pjyyD0CVXNA

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cxoNsRnlaA

    Ray Charles
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFDmKGTq9Cw

    Herb Ellis, Tal Farlow, and Charlie Byrd
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTnIM5TlfAM


    "Georgia on My Mind" is a song written in 1930 by Hoagy Carmichael (music) and Stuart Gorrell (lyrics). It is the official state song of the U.S. state of Georgia. Gorrell wrote the lyrics for Hoagy's sister, Georgia Carmichael.[1] However, the lyrics of the song are ambiguous enough to refer either to the state or to a woman named "Georgia". Carmichael's 1965 autobiography, Sometimes I Wonder, records the origin: a friend, saxophonist and bandleader Frankie Trumbauer, suggested: "Why don't you write a song called 'Georgia?' Nobody lost much writing about the South." Thus, the song is universally believed to have been written about the state.
    The song was first recorded on September 15, 1930 in New York by Hoagy Carmichael and His Orchestra with Bix Beiderbecke on muted cornet and Hoagy Carmichael on vocals. The recording was part of Bix Beiderbecke's last recording session. The recording was released as Victor 23013 with "One Night in Havana".
    Frankie Trumbauer had the first major hit recording in 1931 when his recording made the top ten on the charts. Trumbauer had suggested that Carmichael compose the song.
    Ray Charles, a native of Georgia, recorded it in 1960 on the album The Genius Hits the Road. It became Georgia's state song in 1979. Inspired by this blues version, Willie Nelson formally introduced the song to country audiences in 1978 as a #1 Country/Western hit.




    Versions

    The song was first recorded by Hoagy Carmichael (with Bix Beiderbecke) in 1930. The song has subsequently been covered by many artists, significant among them: Frankie Trumbauer and His Orchestra, Louis Armstrong, Mildred Bailey in 1931, Dean Martin, Glenn Miller, Zac Brown Band, Michael Bublé, Ian Moss, Willie Nelson, Michael Bolton, Anita O'Day, Ella Fitzgerald, Rebecca Parris, Jo Stafford, Red McKenzie and His Mound City Blue Blowers in 1931, Gladys Knight, Gene Krupa, Grover Washington, Jr., James Brown, Michael Bolton, Alicia Keys and Jamie Foxx, Usher, Fats Waller, Billie Holiday, Nat Gonella and his Georgians, The Band, Django Reinhardt, Wes Montgomery, John Mayer, Jerry Lee Lewis, The Righteous Brothers, Tom Jones, Van Morrison, Coldplay, The Joel Haynes Trio (with Denzel Sinclair) and the Spencer Davis Group (with Steve Winwood on vocals), Tony Rice in his California Autumn album, as well as Arturo Sandoval in his Ronnie Scott's Jazz House album, and an instrumental version by Oscar Peterson. Czech singer Pavel Novak recorded song in 1968. Bing Crosby recorded this song twice: 1956 with Buddy Cole and his trio for the LP New Tricks and 1975 with Paul Smith and Band for the LP A Southern Memoir.
    On 30 July 1963, Lou Rawls recorded the song for his album "Tobacco Road". Cold Chisel's version of the song appeared on the album Barking Spiders Live: 1983 and has become a staple of their live shows. Guitarist Ian Moss still performs the song and a live version is included in his "Let's All Get Together" album. In 1988, pianist Rob Mullins covered the song from his album "Fifth Gear."[2] American Idol (Season contestant Matt Giraud performed this song during Hollywood Week Second Solo Performance. In 2006, saxophonist Gerald Albright covered the song off the album "New Beginnings."[3][4]
    In 2006, Jimmy Sommers, another saxophonist covered the song for his Standards album "Time Stands Still."[5][6]
    Ray Charles

    It was not until Ray Charles' 1960 recording on The Genius Hits the Road that the song became a major hit, reaching the number one spot for one week in November 1960 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. On March 7, 1979, in a mutual symbol of reconciliation after conflict over civil rights issues, he performed it before the Georgia General Assembly (the state legislature). After this performance, the connection to the state was firmly made, and then the Assembly adopted it as the state song on April 24.
    This version of the song was played with a video montage each time that Georgia Public Television went off the air nightly. With the advent of 24-hour broadcasting, it is rarely used now, the last time being in 2009 for the permanentsign-off of GPB's analog TV stations on February 17.
    The song was used as the theme song to the CBSsitcom Designing Women (set in Atlanta), initially as an instrumental (performed by Doc Severinsen), and later in a recording by Ray Charles. Charles' version was also sampled for rap group Field Mob's 2005 single, "Georgia", featuring Jamie Foxx and Ludacris.
    Sometime after 2000, Charles invited the Italian singer Giorgia Todrani to sing the song with him after learning that she was named in honor of the song.
    Jamie Foxx and Alicia Keys, backed by Quincy Jones & his Orchestra, performed a new arrangement in honour of Ray Charles at the 2005 Grammy Awards.
    Willie Nelson

    Willie Nelson recorded "Georgia" on his 1978 album Stardust. It was released as single, peaked at No. 1 for a single week and total of 16 weeks on a country chart. A year later, Willie Nelson won a Grammy award for Best Male Country Vocal Performance.
    Chart performance

    Chart (197Peak
    position
    U.S. Billboard Hot Country Singles1U.S. Billboard Hot 10084Canadian RPM Country Tracks1Canadian RPM Top Singles86Canadian RPM Adult Contemporary Tracks16
    Cultural significance

    In 2003, Rolling Stone magazine named "Georgia on My Mind" the 44th greatest song of all time.
    The title of the song was used as the state of Georgia's license plate slogan exclusively from January 1997 through November 2003, with some of these plates remaining valid through at least December 2009.
    Georgia's welcome sign says "Welcome. We're glad Georgia's on your mind.", a reference to the state song.[original research?]
    The song is referenced in The Beatles' "Back in the U.S.S.R.", with the line "Georgia's always on my mind" referring to the Georgian SSR (Soviet Georgia).
    The song is featured in the Stone Mountain Laser Show that runs each summer outside Atlanta.
    The song was one of the songs of the 1996 Summer Olympics held in Atlanta.
    In the television show Quantum Leap, the Ray Charles version of the song is used in several episodes, since it was the song which played at the wedding of the supporting character Al Calavicci. The usage license was limited, and when the series was released on DVD in the USA, the producers decided they could not afford to renew the rights, so the song was replaced with generic instrumental music. Since the song was used in several emotional scenes, some fans were disappointed with this decision.
    The song is mentioned in the Johnny Flynn song, "Hong Kong Cemetery".
    The song is featured at the end of the House episode "Saviors" performed by Hugh Laurie.
    Part of song was used as Sky Sports coverage of 2011 The Masters golf tournament, being used at every commercial break.
    It was the first song The Libertines performed together since their 2004 split, when they opened with it at a guerilla gig at the Boogaloo Pub.
    It is the corps song for the Spirit of Atlanta Drum and Bugle Corps.
    Lyrics

    The original lyrics, including the commonly excised introductory verse, are in the Georgia Code under license.
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    "(Up the) Lazy River" is a popularsong by Hoagy Carmichael and Sidney Arodin, published in 1930. The song is considered a jazz and pop standard, and has been recorded by many artists.

    Louis Armstrong
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PckC9rPwXmI

    Mills Brothers
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QH1e6G0K3Pk


    Louis Prima
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8Qk4khPEEY
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    Skylark
    Hoagy Carmichael


    Dinah Shore
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHVUxgXTb5g&feature=related


    Arethra Franklin
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHYDafTrpMU&feature=related



    "Skylark" is an American popular song with lyrics by Johnny Mercer and music by Hoagy Carmichael, published in 1941.[1] Mercer said that he struggled for a year, after he got the music from Carmichael, before he could get the lyrics right.[2] The yearning expressed in the lyrics is Mercer's longing for Judy Garland, with whom Mercer had an affair.[3] This song is considered a jazz standard.[4]
    An early recording, soon after it was published, was by Anita O'Day with the Gene Krupa Orchestra on 25 November, 1941[5]
    The song was recorded by Glenn Miller & His Orchestra, with vocals by Ray Eberle,[1] rising to #7 on the charts in 1942.[citation needed]
    Ella Fitzgerald recorded this on her Verve release Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Johnny Mercer Songbook (1964) with arrangements by Nelson Riddle.
    Aretha Franklin recorded the song for her album "Laughing on the Outside" (1962).
    The song was recorded by Bobby Darin for his album Love Swings. The song has also been recorded by the English/Australian classic rock band Sky in 1982.[citation needed] In 2009, Renee Olstead sang it on her second album by the same name.
    The song was recently re-recorded by Janis Siegel on Steve Hass's debut album, Traveler. Steve is the current Manhattan Transfer drummer and percussionist.[citation needed]
    In 1973, Bette Midler recorded the song for her album Bette Midler (1973).
    In 1984, Linda Ronstadt recorded the song with Nelson Riddle from her album "Lush Life".
    In 1998, Clint Eastwood's movie Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997) that takes place in Mercer's birth town Savannah, Georgia, used this song as ending title, sung by k.d. Lang.
    In 2008, R&B/jazz singer Miki Howard recorded the song for her album Private Collection.
    Additionally, the song is believed to have inspired a long-running Buick car of the same name that ran from 1953 to 1998.
    Rachael Price has also performed this song in one of her CDs.
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    Rocking Chair
    by Hoagy Carmichael

    Louis Armstrong and Jack Teagarden
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bGfwrBfsCZ8

    Hoagy Carmichael, 1956
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vapoNZBrGxA

    Mildred Bailey
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ntl2tKQFdI


    "Rockin' Chair" is popular song with music by Hoagy Carmichael. Musically, it is unconventional as after the B section when most popular songs return to A, this song has an A-B-C-A1 structure. Mildred Bailey made it famous by using it as her theme song. Frank Sinatra recorded a definitive version.[1]
    It was first recorded by Louis Armstrong at Okeh studios in the 1930s after the stock market crashed, giving a badly needed boost to Carmichael's finances. The song utilises "call and response" to create a dialog between an aged father and his son. He performed Rockin' Chair numerous times in his career with his trombonist Jack Teagarden.
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    Stardust
    by Hoagy Carmichael

    Isham Jones
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWQit9LHk3I

    Bing Crosby
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLrfUQgvQVc&feature=

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lp5uBTsaURI&feature=related

    Louis Armstrong
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r94-7nJt-WM

    Bennie Goodman Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diuRYM7EABs

    Nat King Cole
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DjU6ZjrQulc



    "Stardust" is an American popular song composed in 1927 by Hoagy Carmichael with lyrics added in 1929 by Mitchell Parish. Originally titled "Star Dust", Carmichael first recorded the song at the Gennett Records studio in Richmond, Indiana. The song, "a song about a song about love",[1] played in an idiosyncratic melody in medium tempo, became an American standard, and is considered one of the most recorded songs of the 20th century, with over 1,500 total recordings.[2] In 2004, Carmichael's original 1927 recording of the song was one of 50 recordings chosen by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Register

    Composition
    "Stardust" (the song's original title was "Star Dust", which has long been compounded into "Stardust")[3] was written at the Book Nook in Bloomington, Indiana (across the street from the Indiana University School of Law, where Carmichael had attended school) on an old upright piano, and first recorded in Richmond, Indiana, for Gennett Records (Gennett 6311) by Carmichael with Emil Seidel and his Orchestra and the Dorsey brothers as "Hoagy Carmichael and His Pals" on October 31, 1927, as a peppy (but mid-tempo) jazz instrumental. Carmichael said he was inspired by the types of improvisations made by Bix Beiderbecke.[4] The tune at first attracted only moderate attention, mostly from fellow musicians, a few of whom (including Don Redman) recorded their own versions of Carmichael's tune.
    Mitchell Parish wrote lyrics for the song, based on his own and Carmichael's ideas, which were published in 1929. A slower version had been recorded in October 1928, but the real transformation came on May 16, 1930, when bandleader Isham Jones recorded it as a sentimental ballad.[5]
    Covers

    Jones' recording became the first of many hit versions of the tune. Young baritone sensation Bing Crosby released a version in 1931 and by the following year over two dozen bands had recorded "Stardust". It was then covered by almost every prominent band of that era. Versions have been recorded by Louis Armstrong, Tommy Dorsey, Tex Beneke with The Glenn Miller Orchestra (Recorded in New York City on February 1, 1947 and released by RCA Victor Records as catalogue number 20-2016B[6] and by EMI on the His Master's Voice label as catalogue number BD 596, Frank Sinatra, Billie Holiday, Jan Garber, Fumio Nanri, Dizzy Gillespie, Nat King Cole, Mel Tormé, Connie Francis, Jean Sablon, Keely Smith, Terumasa Hino, Harry Connick Jr, Ella Fitzgerald, Olavi Virta, The Peanuts, Django Reinhardt, Barry Manilow, John Coltrane, Earl Grant, Willie Nelson, Billy Ward and His Dominoes, George Benson, Mina, Ken Hirai and many others. Glenn Miller also released a recording of the song on V-Disc, No. 65A, with a spoken introduction recorded with the AAFTC Orchestra which was released in December, 1943. Billy Ward and His Dominoes had a #13 hit with the song on the Billboard Pop chart. However, it has been the Artie Shaw version of 1941, with memorable solos by Billy Butterfield (trumpet) and Jack Jenney (trombone) that remains the favorite orchestral version of the Big Band era. Ringo Starr recorded a version for his first solo album, Sentimental Journey in 1970, after the break-up of The Beatles. Rod Stewart recorded the song for his album "Stardust: The Great American Songbook Volume III" (2004). Katie Melua recorded a cover on her EP Nine Million Bicycles in 2005. Michael Bublé recorded it for his album "Crazy Love" released in 2009.
    Certain recorded variations on the song have become notable. Armstrong recorded "Stardust" on November 4, 1931, and on an alternate take inserted the lyric 'oh, memory' just before an instrumental break. This version became prized over the issued take among jazz collectors, including Carmichael.[7] Thirty years later, Sinatra recorded just the verse on his November 20, 1961 recording for his album Sinatra and Strings - much to Carmichael's initial chagrin, although Hoagy is said to have changed his mind upon hearing the recording.
    In 1993, guitarist Larry Coryell covered the song from his album "Fallen Angel."[8][9]
    Les Deux Love Orchestra included their version of Stardust on the 2001 album, "Music From Les Deux Cafés."
    In 2006, David Benoit covered the song from his Standards album "Standards."[10]
    While the song has been traditionally performed as a ballad, vocalist Kalil Wilson recorded an uptempo version of the song for his 2009 album, "Easy to Love".
    Willie Nelson's cover of the song was used to wake up the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS-97 on their second flight day.[11]
    Legacy

    In 1999, "Stardust" was included in the "NPR 100", a list compiled by National Public Radio of the 100 most important American musical works of the 20th century.[12] In 2000, Swedish music reviewers voted it as "the tune of the century", with Kurt Weill's "Mack the Knife" as second.[citation needed] In 2004, Carmichael's original 1927 recording of the song was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry.
    Last edited by Whitey44; 05-30-2011 at 11:56 PM.
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  36. #2536
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    Lazy Bones
    Hoagy Carmichael

    Hoagy Carmichael and Dorothy Dandridge duet
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5L7Svf7Gmws

    Mills Brothers vocal group
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5L7Svf7Gmws

    Leon Redbone vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qROwjULKVj0

    Bing Crosby and Lois Armstrong
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0nToTmz-sk


    Lazybones or "Lazy Bones" is a Tin Pan Alley song written in 1933, with lyrics by Johnny Mercer and music by Hoagy Carmichael. Major hit records at the time of introduction included Ted Lewis and Mildred Bailey. Jonathan King's 1971 revival was played on US soft rock stations, earning a position on Billboard's Easy Listening chart. According to Carmichael, in an interview, Mercer came into Carmichael’s apartment in New York one day and saw Hoagy “snoozin’” on his couch. Mercer said, “Hoag, I’m gonna write a song called ‘Lazy Bones’.” Carmichael said, “Well, let’s get at it.” They went over to Hoagy’s piano, Johnny said the first line and Hoagy started playing a melody. The song was done in twenty minutes. Both men have agreed on the time in separate interviews.
    Mercer was a southern boy from Savannah, Georgia, and resented the Tin Pan Alley attitude of rejecting southern regional vernacular in favor of artificial southern songs written by people who had never been to the South. Alex Wilder attributes much of the popularity of this song to Mercer's perfect regional lyric.[1]
    He wrote the lyrics to "Lazybones" as a protest against those artificial "Dixies", announcing the song's authenticity at the start with "Long as there is chicken gravy on your rice".[2]
    Recordings

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    Heart Soul
    Hoagy Carmichael

    Larry Clinton Orchestra with Bea Wain vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h9-WLXm_faE

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ph7q-A0bt1M

    Dean Martin
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnAmwaZR_nA&feature=related

    popular solo piano version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRAp89tJMyk

    Jan and Dean, doowop version, not jazz
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NNS8LHFin5U

    "Heart and Soul" is a popular song, with music by Hoagy Carmichael and lyrics by Frank Loesser, published in 1938. The original 1938 version was performed by Larry Clinton & his Orchestra featuring Bea Wain. The song's A-section is often simplified as a repeating I-vi-IV-V progression and taught to beginning piano students as an easy two-hand duet ( example (help·info)). Much like the song "Chopsticks," this (somewhat inaccurate) version became widely-known, even to those who have never studied piano. The chord progression, often referred to as the "'50s progression," later became very common in the doo-wop hits of the 1950s and 1960s.
    In 1939, three versions charted: Larry Clinton (reaching #1 on the chart), Eddy Duchin (reaching #12), and Al Donahue (reaching #16). The song later charted as #11 in 1952 by The Four Aces, as #57 in 1956 by Larry Maddox, as #18 in 1961 by The Cleftones, and as #25 in 1961 by Jan and Dean. Many other versions have been recorded.
    Contents

    Recorded versions



    Appearances in film and television

    • The film American Graffiti features the song being played on the Wolfman Jack Show, performed by The Cleftones
    • The film The Competition features a humorous section where the leading competitors suddenly burst out playing "Heart and Soul" while practicing the piano
    • The film Big features the song being played on a giant electronic keyboard.
    • The film Stuart Little features the song, played and sung by Hugh Laurie and Geena Davis.
    • The band Liquid Tension Experiment plays a part of the song at the end of "Universal Mind" on their Liquid Tension Experiment album.
    • In Star Trek: Voyager, Season 5 Episode 18 "Course Oblivion", Harry plays the song with his Clarinet just before B'Elanna Torres enters the room for her wedding with Tom Paris.
    • The film Superman Returns also features the song being played on a grand piano inside of Lex Luthor's yacht.
    • In episode 20 of the TV series, Lost, the song is played in a flashback by Jack Shepherd and his new wife.
    • In episode 20, season 5 of the TV series, Frasier, the song is sung by Niles and Daphne while chopping vegetables in Niles' kitchen.
    • In episode 6 of the TV series Raines, Michael Raines plays Heart and Soul amateurishly with a murdered 10-year-old girl that he imagines. It's shown that while he plays one part, he hums the other.
    • In episode 17, season 5 of Family Guy, the tune is played by Stewie to mock Peter, a parody of the scene in the film Amadeus where Mozart mocks Salieri.
    • In episode 17, season 9 of Family Guy, played by Stewie and Brian before the Big Bang when there where no laws of physic.
    • Steve Goodman's song "Penny Evans", referring to American draftees killed in Vietnam, mentions "fifty thousand 'Heart and Souls' being played with just one hand."
    • The song is briefly played in the First Communion ceremony at the beginning of The Godfather, Part II.
    • In 'Cro-Magnon', Season 1 Episode 12 of Ally McBeal, the song is played by Ally and her well-endowed date.
    • The song is featured in the musical revue Forever Plaid.
    • In the season 3 finale of Ellen, the song was played and sung at Paige's wedding.
    • In the Simpsons season 20, the episode, Gone Maggie Gone, Lisa plays it on the piano to unlock a clue.
    • In season six of Scrubs, Kim Briggs and J.D. play the song on a piano, J.D. playing the left-hand part, Kim playing the right-hand part with her nose. This offends the woman in the house, who has no thumbs.
    • In the The Heart of Me original soundtrack Helena Bonham Carter performed this song, it's not in included in the movie, it only appears in the Original Soundtrack.
    • In the episode "Imaginary Friend" of The Nanny Maggie plays Heart and Soul upon request of Brighton.
    • The film 127 Hours features the song in one of the flashbacks.
    • In the episode 5 of Now and Again
    • In the film "Racing with the Moon" it is played by Sean Penn and Elizabeth McGovern.
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    I Get Along Without You Very Well
    by Hoagy Carmichael

    Billie Holiday
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SN11IyZhEw

    Frank Sinatra live video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYh5_rvYSj8

    Chet Baker
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgbPHTBiAVQ

    Nina Simone
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_22tXp1g44U

    Linda Ronstadt
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4LOb0S5UZ8

    "I Get Along Without You Very Well" is a popular song composed by Hoagy Carmichael in 1939, with lyrics based on a poem written by Jane Brown Thompson.[1] Thompson's identity as the author of the poem was for many years unknown, she died the night before it was introduced on radio by Dick Powell.[1]
    The biggest-selling hit version was a 1939 version by Red Norvo and his orchestra, with a vocal by Terry Allen.[2]
    It was performed by Carmichael and Jane Russell in the film The Las Vegas Story (1952).[1]
    Notable recordings

    Simon's version served as background music for animator Ryan McCulloch's claymation short "Without You" (animated when he was 14), about a dog who pines for his absent young master.
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    Take The A Train
    Billy Strayhorn

    Duke Ellington
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHRbEhLj540

    Duke Ellington Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRGFqSkNjHk

    Ella Fitzgerald
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQBnmrKrL6Y

    Dave Brubeck
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbUklDXdH2o&feature=related



    "Take the 'A' Train" is a jazz standard by Billy Strayhorn that was the signature tune of the Duke Ellington orchestra. It is arguably the most famous of the many compositions to emerge from the collaboration of Ellington and Strayhorn.
    History

    The use of the Strayhorn composition as the signature tune was made necessary by a ruling in 1940 by ASCAP. When ASCAP (American Society of Composers and Publishers) raised its licensing fees for broadcast use, many ASCAP members, including Ellington, could no longer play their compositions over radio, as most music was played live on radio in those days. Ellington turned to Billy Strayhorn and son Mercer Ellington, who were registered with ASCAP competitor BMI to "write a whole new book for the band," Mercer recalled." 'A' Train" was one of many songs written by Strayhorn, and was picked to replace "Sepia Panorama" as the band's signature song. Mercer recalled that he found the song in a trash can after Strayhorn discarded a draft of it because it sounded too much like a Fletcher Henderson arrangement. The song was first recorded on January 15, 1941 as a standard transcription for radio broadcast. The first (and most famous) commercial recording was made on February 15, 1941.
    The title refers to the A subway service that runs through New York City, going at that time from eastern Brooklyn up into Harlem and northern Manhattan, using the express tracks in Manhattan.
    "Take the 'A' Train" was composed in 1938, after Ellington offered Strayhorn a job in his organization and gave him money to travel from Pittsburgh to New York City. Ellington wrote directions for Strayhorn to get to his house by subway, directions that began, "Take the A Train." Strayhorn was a great fan of Fletcher Henderson's arrangements. "One day, I was thinking about his style, the way he wrote for trumpets, trombones and saxophones, and I thought I would try something like that," Strayhorn recalled in Stanley Dance's The World Of Duke Ellington.
    Although Strayhorn said he wrote lyrics for it, the recorded first lyrics were composed by or for the Delta Rhythm Boys. The lyrics used by the Ellington band were added by Joya Sherrill, who was 17 at the time (1944). She made up the words at her home in Detroit, while the song played on the radio. Her father, a noted Detroit Black Activist, set up a meeting with Ellington. Due to Joya's remarkable poise and singing ability and her unique take on the song, Ellington hired her as a vocalist and adopted her lyrics. The vocalist who most often performed the song with the Ellington band was trumpeter Ray Nance, who enhanced the lyrics with numerous choruses of scat singing. Nance is also responsible for the trumpet solo on the first recording, which was so well suited for the song that it has often been duplicated note for note by others.
    Based loosely on the chordal structure of "Exactly Like You", the song combines the propulsive swing of the 1940s-era Ellington band with the confident sophistication of Ellington and the black elite who inhabited Sugar Hill in Harlem. The tune is in AABA form, in the key of C, with each section being a lyric couplet. (The Ellington band's version begins in C and rises to the key of Eb after the second chorus.)
    Ella Fitzgerald sang and recorded this song many times; for a live version with Ella's signature scatting, see her 1961 Verve release Ella in Hollywood. Midwestern Rockers, Chicago added their version in 1995 on their back-to-the-roots-disc, Night & Day Big Band. Jo Stafford recorded a comedy version of the song under the pseudonym, Darlene Edwards.
    Legacy

    The Rolling Stones used the song as the introductory track on their 1982 live album "Still Life" (American Concert 1981).
    In 1999, National Public Radio included this song in the "NPR 100", in which NPR's music editors sought to compile the one hundred most important American musical works of the 20th century.
    The Voice of America Jazz Hour, hosted by Willis Conover, used this song as its theme.
    The Cherry Poppin' Daddies used the song's opening piano lick (albeit in a different key) to open their song 'Ding-Dong Daddy of the D Car Line'.
    The opening number to the musical In The Heights includes a brief homage to this song when Usnavi sings, "You must take the 'A' Train / Even farther than Harlem to northern Manhattan and maintain / Get off at 181st and take the escalator / I hope you're writing this down, I'm gonna test ya later."
    In 2009, the PBS series History Detectives aired an episode[1] revealing that an original set of publishing plates for the song were in the possession by Garfield Gillings of Brooklyn, NY. Gillings stated that that he found the plates at least twenty years earlier in a dumpster. Reporter Tukufu Zuberi brought the plates to the Smithsonian Institution, where curator John Hasse, who oversees the Duke Ellington collection, certified that the plates were most likely used for the first publications for Ellington's Tempo Publishing Company. Archived copies of the published sheet music were nearly identical to prints that had been made from the publishing plates.
    Lyrics

    Over the years the lyrics have contained many variations, as is not unusual for songs of this era. Those below are representative only, and may not be the original Sherrill lyrics:
    You must take the A TrainTo go to Sugar Hill way up in HarlemIf you miss the A TrainYou'll find you've missed the quickest way to HarlemHurry, get on, now, it's comingListen to those rails a-thrumming (All Aboard!)Get on the A TrainSoon you will be on Sugar Hill in Harlem
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    Lush Life
    Billy Strayhorn

    Johnny Hartman vocal with Jone Coltrane on sax
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7d6_LUDa_Zw

    Chet Baker instrumental
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMZhi_hgRdg&feature=related

    Nancy Wilson
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hGRKWG6Y08w&feature=related

    Sarah Vaughan vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfILDaE8auU&feature=related

    Queen Latifah vocal
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rXqkxEP_1io

    "Lush Life" is a jazz standard with lyrics and music written by Billy Strayhorn from 1933 to 1938. However, the song was only performed privately by Strayhorn until he and vocalist Kay Davis performed it on November 13, 1948 with the Duke Ellington Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. It is usually performed in the key of D-flat major.
    The song's lyrics describe the author's weariness of the night life after a failed romance, wasting time with "jazz and cocktails" at "come-what-may places" and in the company of girls with "sad and sullen gray faces/with distingué traces". Strayhorn was only 16 when he wrote the majority of the song, which was to become his signature composition (along with "Take the "A" Train").
    One of the most notable recordings of "Lush Life" was by Nat King Cole. John Coltrane also recorded it at least twice, once in 1958 as the title track of an album for Prestige Records, and again in 1963 with his "classic quartet" and Johnny Hartman singing. The Johnny Hartman version is considered definitive. The earlier version was 14 minutes long. But the author once said that the best version was of Billy Eckstine on his 1960 album No Cover, No Minimum.
    Jack Jones recorded "Lush Life" for his album Where Love Has Gone (1964). Donna Summer recorded the song with Quincy Jones for her self titled 1982 album. In 1985 it was the title track of Lush Life, the second of Linda Ronstadt's three albums of American standards. Natalie Cole recorded a version of the song for 1991 album, Unforgettable... with Love. Queen Latifah recorded a Mervyn Warren arrangement of the song for inclusion in the soundtrack to the 1998 film Living Out Loud, a recording that was subsequently included on The Dana Owens Album in 2004. Paul Ruffino a long time Johnny Hartman devotee performed the song in a sold out Hartman perspective in 2004 in Manhattan. It was performed by theremin virtuoso Pamelia Kurstin at the 2002 TED conference.
    Other artists who have recorded the song include: Sylvia Brooks, Tito Puente, Nancy Wilson, Patti LuponeElla Fitzgerald & Oscar Peterson, Sarah Vaughan, Stan Getz, Julie London, Johnny Mathis, Chet Baker, Blossom Dearie, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Natalie Cole, Rickie Lee Jones, Rare Silk, Kate Ceberano & Mark Isham, Buddy Rich, Rickie Lee Jones, Kurt Elling, Lisa Ekdahl, Donna Summer and Sammy Davis Jr..
    Last edited by Whitey44; 06-05-2011 at 09:05 PM.
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    Thank goodness you moved on to Billy Strayhorn, Whitey!

    All those Hoagies were making me crave sub sandwiches!
    Visit: DANGER CAN BE SEXY;OPEN INVITATION;FILM NOIR PICS & IMAGES;SULTRY KISS;GALLERY OF PLAYBOYS;GIRLS WITH BALLS; CLASSIC COMICS BOOKS;PIN-UPS;SNEAKING IN TONGUES;34U2 ; BETTER ON VINYL;IT! THE THREAD FROM BEYOND SPACE
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    Chelsea Bridge
    Billy Strayhorn

    Billy Strayhorn piano solo
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mh8qTnusNnY

    Ben Webster, live 1944 video
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQJybhk47xU

    Duke Ellington Orchestra
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVlB1LzlgCY

    Joe Henderson sax feature
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfTfZCsjWZo


    "Chelsea Bridge" (1941) is a jazz standard written by Billy Strayhorn. The song has been recorded by Duke Ellington, Ben Webster, Wynton Marsalis, Keith Jarrett, Lew Tabackin, Vince Guaraldi, and Tony Bennett, among many others. Ella Fitzgerald recorded it with Ellington on her albums Ella Fitzgerald Sings the Duke Ellington Songbook (1957) and Ella and Duke at the Cote D'Azur (1967).
    In 1958, lyrics were written for the song by Bill Comstock, a member of the The Four Freshmen. According to Ellington biographer James Lincoln Collier, during a trip to Europe, Strayhorn actually saw a J. M. W. Turner or James McNeill Whistler painting of Battersea Bridge and mistakenly named the song after Chelsea Bridge.[1]
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    Quote Originally Posted by umpire2 View Post
    Thank goodness you moved on to Billy Strayhorn, Whitey!

    All those Hoagies were making me crave sub sandwiches!
    Don't stray while I cover Strayhorn!
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    Thankz for share :D
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    Very nice, Whitey
    Visit: DANGER CAN BE SEXY;OPEN INVITATION;FILM NOIR PICS & IMAGES;SULTRY KISS;GALLERY OF PLAYBOYS;GIRLS WITH BALLS; CLASSIC COMICS BOOKS;PIN-UPS;SNEAKING IN TONGUES;34U2 ; BETTER ON VINYL;IT! THE THREAD FROM BEYOND SPACE
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    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/04/ar...ies-at-79.html

    Ray Bryant, Jazz Pianist, Dies at 79

    By NATE CHINEN

    Published: June 3, 2011

    Ray Bryant, a jazz pianist whose sensitivity and easy authority made him a busy accompanist and a successful solo artist, beginning in the mid-1950s, died on Thursday. He was 79.

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    Ray Bryant performing at Town Hall in New York in 1998.



    His wife of 20 years, Claude Bryant, said he died at New York Hospital Queens after a long illness. He lived in Jackson Heights, Queens.
    Mr. Bryant had a firm touch and an unshakable sense of time, notably in his left hand, which he often used to build a bedrock vamp. Even in a bebop setting, he favored the ringing tonalities of the gospel church. And he was sumptuously at home with the blues, as a style and a sensibility but never as an affectation.
    All of this contributed to his accomplishment as a solo pianist. His first solo piano album was “Alone With the Blues,” in 1958, and he went on to make a handful of others, including “Alone at Montreux,” “Solo Flight” and “Montreux ’77.” His most recent release, “In the Back Room,” was yet another solo album, recorded live at Rutgers University and released on the Evening Star label in 2008.
    Raphael Homer Bryant was born on Dec. 24, 1931, in Philadelphia, and made his name in that city during its considerable postwar jazz boom. Along with his brother, Tommy, a bassist, he played in the house band at the Blue Note Club in Philadelphia, which had a steady flow of major talent dropping in from New York. (Charlie Parker and Miles Davis were among the musicians they played with there.) In short order Mr. Bryant had plenty of prominent sideman work, both with and without his brother.
    One early measure of his ascent was the album “Meet Betty Carter and Ray Bryant,” released on Columbia in 1955. It was a splashy introduction for him as well as for Ms. Carter, the imposingly gifted jazz singer. It was soon followed by “The Ray Bryant Trio” (Prestige), an accomplished album that introduced Mr. Bryant’s composition “Blues Changes,” with its distinctive chord progression.
    That song would become a staple of the jazz literature, if less of a proven standard than “Cubano Chant,” the sprightly Afro-Cuban fanfare that Mr. Bryant recorded under his own name and in bands led by the drummers Art Blakey, Art Taylor and Jo Jones.
    Mr. Bryant had several hit songs early in his solo career, beginning with “Little Susie,” an original blues that he recorded both for the Signature label and for Columbia. In 1960 he reached No. 30 on the Billboard chart with a novelty song called “The Madison Time,” rushed into production to capitalize on a dance craze. (The song has had a durable afterlife, appearing on the soundtrack to the 1988 movie “Hairspray,” and in the recent Broadway musical production.) He later broke into the Top 100 with a cover of Bobbie Gentry’s “Ode to Billie Joe,” released just a few months after the original, in 1967.
    But Mr. Bryant’s legacy never rested on his chart success or his nimble response to popular trends. It can be discerned throughout his own discography and in some of his work as a sideman, notably with the singers Carmen McRae and Jimmy Rushing, and on albums like Dizzy Gillespie’s “Sonny Side Up,” on Verve. “After Hours,” a track on that album, begins with Mr. Bryant and his brother playing a textbook slow-drag blues.
    Along with his wife, Mr. Bryant is survived by a son, Raphael Bryant Jr.; a daughter, Gina; three grandchildren; and two brothers, Leonard and Lynwood. Mr. Bryant’s sister, Vera Eubanks, is the mother of several prominent jazz musicians: Robin Eubanks, a trombonist; Kevin Eubanks, the guitarist and former bandleader on “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno”; and Duane Eubanks, a trumpeter.
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    Lotus Blossom
    Billy Strayhorn


    Duke Ellington
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jjz_0FUHp0s&feature=related
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