1. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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    Undy why dont you tell us something of F35 lightning great falure, It seems that USA gonna stay without air support. And everybody knows that with no air support US soldiers wont even go take a shit at road side.
     
  2. freethinker

    freethinker Pervy Bear

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    Among the facts revealed in the ongoing criminal proceedings against U.S. Navy officials and defense contractor Leonard ("Fat Leonard") Francis, who is charged with arranging kickbacks: In 2007 Francis staged a party for the officials at the Shangri-La Hotel in the Philippines during which (according to an indictment unsealed in March) "historical memorabilia related to General Douglas MacArthur were used by the participants in sexual acts." [Washington Post, 3-14-2017]
     
  3. freethinker

    freethinker Pervy Bear

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    On March 22, as North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un prepared to test-launch a missile and tensions rose on the volatile Korean peninsula, a lone B-1B Lancer bomber took off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam and flew across the Pacific on a Continuous Bomber Presence sortie.

    It rendezvoused with Japanese F-15J Eagles for a training mission, before flying on to South Korea to further train with their F-15Ks and F-16s.

    But there were supposed to be two B-1Bs there that day. The second bomber that was “scheduled to respond to a clear and present danger in North Korea,” as Rep. Joe Wilson, R-S.C., said in a hearing later that day, was unable to take off. Pacific Air Forces later said a maintenance issue kept the second Lancer on the ground.

    It’s not only B-1Bs having readiness problems. On any given day, according to official statistics, nearly three out of every 10 aircraft in the Air Force’s aging fleet are out of commission — in the shop getting upgrades, undergoing regular maintenance or inspections, or receiving heavier-duty repair work.

    And the problem is getting worse. Mission-capable rates — the metric by which the Air Force measures how much of its fleet can fight or fly other missions at any given time — are trending downward, slowly but steadily.

    In fiscal 2014, mission-capable rates for all of the Air Force’s airplanes and helicopters were just shy of 74 percent.

    One year later, that rate had dropped to 73 percent. It fell even further in 2016, to about 72 percent.

    The decline in readiness is accompanied — and partly caused — by the increasing age of the Air Force’s fleet. The average aircraft age has spiked in recent years, from roughly 24 years in fiscal 2010 to 27 years in 2016.

    Air Force leaders have expressed concern about aircraft readiness rates and aging airframes for the last several years.

    “Our highest investment priority is in improving readiness,” acting Air Force Secretary Lisa Disbrow said March 3 at the Air Force Association’s Air Warfare Symposium in Orlando, Florida. “The aircraft we have on the ramp are too old. We need to revitalize the fleet.”

    Chief of Staff Gen. Dave Goldfein tied aircraft readiness issues to the morale problems plaguing the force and prompting good airmen to leave.

    “Pilots who don’t fly, maintainers who don’t maintain, controllers who don’t control … will not stay with the [Air Force],” Goldfein said.

    Downward trend

    Declining readiness is especially concerning given the relatively small size of the Air Force’s fleet. The Air Force had a total of 5,447 aircraft last year. That’s up slightly from the 5,430 aircraft in 2015, but down from the 5,476 aircraft in 2014 — and a far cry from the roughly 8,600 aircraft in the Air Force’s inventory during Desert Storm.

    The fluctuations in mission-capable rates are hitting different air frames differently, and not all are dropping — indeed, some have shown improvement. But overall, especially in some of the Air Force’s most crucial aircraft, readiness is continuing to fall or remaining at concerningly low levels.

    In 2015, for example, 67 percent of F-22s were ready to fly. Last year, the Raptors’ readiness plunged to 60 percent — the lowest since at least 2009.

    Mission-capable rates for the Air Force’s B-2 Spirit bombers dropped from 56 percent to 51 percent over that time, while the B-1 Lancer rates increased from 47 percent to not quite 52 percent. Despite the improvement, on average, about half of the Air Force’s B-1s and B-2s are grounded.

    (The venerable B-52 Stratofortress fleet — at an average age of 54 years, one of the service’s oldest — is doing the best of all Air Force bombers, with 74 percent flyable at any given time.)

    The A-10 Warthog attack planes, AC-130U Spooky gunships, C-130H and J transport aircraft, E-3 AWACS, MC-130 special operations transport and refueling planes, KC-135 refueling planes, F-15D, F-16C and D and F-35 fighters, T-1A and T-38C trainers, and UH-1N Huey helicopters also saw readiness declines of varying degrees last year.

    When mission-capable rates for aircraft slip, it affects more than just the Air Force’s ability to accomplish its missions, said Brig. Gen. Stacey Hawkins, director of logistics, engineering and force protection for Air Mobility Command.

    “It forces us to prioritize the real-world missions over … our training and readiness requirements,” Hawkins said. “When the mission-capable rates are lower … it affects the long-term readiness of our fleets, our ability to train our air crews, and it has a ripple effect that can take years to fix.”

    Hawkins said seemingly small dips in mission-capable rates can have significant effects on AMC’s ability to move people, weapons, fuel and supplies.

    “Each percentage change is a reduction in capability,” Hawkins said. “A [hypothetical] 5 percentage [point] change in the C-17 MC rate comes out to be approximately 10 aircraft. And when you look at the work measured by million-ton miles per day, that’s cargo-carrying capacity that’s reduced across the board when we see something as small as a 5 percent change in mission capable rates.”

    C-17 rates have remained largely unchanged, at about 85 percent.

    Balancing act

    Managing aircraft readiness is a delicate balance between budgetary, manning and resource realities, modernization needs, training, and operational requirements, said Col. Michael Lawrence, chief of the maintenance division in the Air Force’s directorate of logistics.

    In most cases, aircraft are brought to the depot at pre-planned intervals — usually about every 400 flight hours for most platforms — for expected maintenance and to look for hidden problems.

    “Just like in our cars, if you get the check engine light on the dashboard and take it into the dealership, they do what the manual calls for,” Lawrence said. “We do the same with airplanes.”

    When it can, the Air Force also tries to conduct planned upgrades to aircraft while they’re already looking under the hood, so to speak.

    For example, Lawrence said, two of the Air Force’s 20 B-2A Spirit bombers are now in programmed depot maintenance, and two others are getting modifications. Additional B-2s might need inspections or other repairs, which contributed to the bomber’s slide in mission-capable rates last year.

    But even with B-2s in the shop for one reason or another, the Air Force still needs those bombers to fly training sorties at home and support security packages around the world. For example, two B-2s flew a 34-hour mission in January from Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri to Libya, where they led a strike against an Islamic State training camp near Sirte.

    However, flying such a small fleet of advanced bombers so heavily can lead to further problems, Lawrence said.

    “When you start to fly the same aircraft over and over and over again, the possibility of having some second- and third-order effects, when an aircraft breaks and you’re not able to fix it, begin to manifest themselves,” Lawrence said.

    Fighter problems

    Some of the Air Force’s newest and most advanced fighter jets are experiencing problems of their own that keep them from flying.

    The F-22A Raptor is having problems with its low-observable, or stealth, coating, Lawrence said.

    “In high flow areas, what’s essentially happening is there’s a gradual deterioration of the [stealth] coatings, and they begin to liquefy on the surface,” he said. “So if the [low-observable] coatings aren’t doing what we need them to do, then the platform loses its ability to do its primary mission, which is get behind enemy lines without detection.”

    This means airmen have to spend more time re-applying the stealth coating on the Raptor, which means less time in the air. The F-35A Lightning II has similar issues with its stealth coating, he said, but not to the same degree as the F-22.

    The F-22 is also having issues with its spare parts inventory, Lawrence said. The Air Force conducted modeling on the Raptor to try to predict which parts would break first, to make sure depots had plenty of spares on hand.

    But other parts — particularly avionics components and relay parts — started to break earlier than expected, Lawrence said. And because the Air Force hadn’t predicted an increased need for them, it’s been running out, further delaying some Raptors’ return to the air.

    The Air Force also grounded 13 of its 96 F-35s last year after discovering insulation on coolant tubes was peeling and crumbling, which left potentially damaging residue in the fighter’s fuel. Those planes resumed flying after two months of repairs.

    “That was probably the biggest issue that impacted the F-35,” Lawrence said.

    F-35 rates fell from 67.9 percent in 2015 to 65 percent in 2016.

    Hawkins said the age of some of AMC’s veteran aircraft are causing supply chain issues of their own. Some AMC planes, such as the average 54-year-old KC-135 tanker, rely on parts made by companies that have either gone out of business or stopped making those parts years ago. For example, the KC-135 is based on a Boeing 707 platform, and the last 707 rolled off the line in 1991.

    But it wasn’t always huge contractors who stopped producing parts. The Air Force relied on many small businesses for little structural parts such as specialized screws, brackets, and landing gear components, Hawkins said.

    “A lot of those mom and pop outfits have gone on or merged with other businesses,” Hawkins said. “We can’t go to those same small businesses to replenish the supply chain as we use these parts on aircraft that continue to age.”

    AMC can either go back to those companies and convince them to dust off their plans and tools and restart production on those parts — at a high cost to the Air Force — or Air Force depots have to fabricate parts on their own.

    Rebuilding readiness

    Lawrence said an aircraft mission-capable rate decline of 5 percent is typically within the Air Force’s control limit, but swings of more than 5 percent in a single year are particularly concerning.

    The HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter, for example, dropped from 76.9 percent to about 67.2 percent — nearly 10 percentage points in a single year. That’s concerning, he said, and is partly due to the Pave Hawk’s deployment rates.

    It’s also due to functional check flights and “hover checks” — carefully making sure a helicopter can safely hover above the ground before attempting a full flight — that have to be performed after a thorough Pave Hawk inspection that requires taking it apart completely before putting it back together, he said. Aging Pave Hawks — which are 25.8 years old on average — also require more inspections, he said.

    Lawrence said the Air Force looks at how aircraft’s age is affecting readiness on nearly a daily basis.

    Besides affecting the number of aircraft available to fly at any given time, Lawrence said aircraft age also increases the number of maintenance man-hours required for each flying hour.

    Or, in other words, older planes need more love.

    “In a force where we are trying to rebuild readiness, that is a challenge,” Lawrence said.

    Hawkins also said aircraft age, as well as high operations tempos over the more than 16 years since 9/11, is having an effect on aircraft readiness.

    “The more we fly our aircraft, and the more we actually employ our aircraft in contingency operations, the more stressors that will be placed on our aircraft,” Hawkins said.

    And the Air Force’s severe shortage of experienced maintenance airmen has also put aircraft readiness further behind. The Air Force has made eliminating that shortfall by the end of fiscal 2019 a priority.

    “It has an impact,” Lawrence said of the shortage. “There’s no question that it does. If one were to take their car to the dealership and recognize that there were five cars and only four technicians to work on them, a car wouldn’t get worked on. The same principle applies to aircraft maintenance. So we work very hard to make sure every aircraft gets its just attention each and every day."

    Air Force Times
     
    Wafarer likes this.
    1. Wafarer
      Very informative, thanks!
       
      Wafarer, Apr 4, 2017
    2. justpassingthru
      Rarely do I see a post that needs an intermission lol. It was a little too informative but interesting.

      I rode shotgun in an CF-18 once and that was enough to know that G forces are not your friend ... it is one thing to be in control like when I pilot one of our FunnyCars but another thing to just be along for the ride and be reactive instead of proactive.
       
      justpassingthru, Apr 10, 2017
  4. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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    well done you put me to sleep
     
    Mr Smith 36 and justpassingthru like this.
    1. justpassingthru
      LOL, that was rather long wasn't it. Stumbler would be proud.
       
      justpassingthru, Apr 10, 2017
  5. Wafarer

    Wafarer Supreme Warlord

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    [​IMG]
    100 years ago today, April 9, 1917 was the Battle of Vimy Ridge, lest we forget!
     
    BigSuzyB and justpassingthru like this.
  6. justpassingthru

    justpassingthru No Rest For The Wicked

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    Vimy Ridge: 'What free people are capable of when the essential is at stake'
    [​IMG]

    VIMY RIDGE, France -- They came together from coast to coast to coast, by the thousands, to say thank you and to remember.

    Canadians of all ages and all walks of life, they gathered under the soaring pillars of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial on Sunday to mark the 100th anniversary of that fateful battle -- and reflect on its enduring legacy.

    Exactly 100 years earlier, the scene here had been quite different. The sun that shone down on the masses on Sunday, forcing many to hide behind umbrellas lest they burn, had been non-existent in 1917.

    Instead, rain and sleet and artillery shells had lashed what then was a muddy, bloody battlefield as 30,000 Canadian soldiers huddled in trenches and waited for the assault to kick off.

    But there was one key similarity between that Easter Monday on April 9, 1917, and the scene 100 years later: Canadians stood together, shoulder to shoulder, proudly and unabashedly as one people.

    "These ordinary and extraordinary men of the British dominion fought for the first time as citizens of one and the same country," Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in French as he addressed the crowd.

    "Francophones and Anglophones. New Canadians. Indigenous Peoples. Side by side, united, here in Vimy, within the four divisions of the Canadian Corps."

    The Battle for Vimy Ridge was a distinctly Canadian effort from the beginning, a true demonstration of all the best qualities that Canada represents: individual initiative; esprit de corps; gumption; enthusiasm.

    Unburdened by a history of warfare, the Canadians looked at war differently and adopted new tactics such as the creeping barrage while entrusting the battleplan for the first time to even the lowliest privates.

    But what really set the battle apart was that, for the first time in the Great War, the Canadians would be fighting all together as one single unit: The Canadian Corps.

    Farmers from Weyburn next to miners from Cape Breton. Lawyers from Toronto with lumberjacks from Kelowna. Doctors from Montreal and cowboys from Red Deer.

    And despite suffering horrible casualties during the four-day battle, with 3,598 dead and more than 7,000 wounded, they would succeed where the British and French had failed by capturing the ridge.

    "This was and remains the single bloodiest day in Canadian military history," Prince Charles, representing the British monarchy, told the assembled crowd.

    "Yet Canadians displayed a strength of character and commitment to one another that is still evident today. They did not waver. This was Canada at its best."

    Yet it wasn't Canada's fighting prowess that was being touted as the legacy of Vimy on Sunday: It was the creation of a country committed to peace.

    "Those spires stand for peace and for freedom," Gov. Gen. David Johnston said, indicating the white towers of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial behind him.

    "They stand for justice and hope. And they remind us that one cannot exist without the other. Without freedom, there can be no peace. Because freedom without peace is agony, and peace without freedom is slavery."

    French President Francois Hollande said the "blue ghosts of Vimy" serve as a reminder, not just of what happened 100 years ago, but what "free peoples" even today must sometimes do to protect peace.

    "They tell us what free peoples are capable of when the essential is at stake," he said in French.

    With all of those who fought not only at Vimy, but the Great War, now gone, it fell to other ways to remember them and their stories.

    One pair of empty black combat boots for each of the men who died fighting for the ridge was placed atop the monument or on the vibrant green grass of the surrounding ridge.

    Meanwhile, actors took on the personas of those who lived through that terrible time, bringing not only soldiers back to life, but also their mothers and fathers, wives and even nurses.

    The ceremony itself was a mix of contemporary and traditional, as musical performances were followed by a lone bagpiper's mournful playing of The Lament and the laying of wreaths at Canada Bereft's feet.

    There was also a clear effort to include Canada's indigenous people, who played a significant role in the First World War.

    The emotion of the event was too much for some to bear.

    Speaking to a reporter afterward, Second World War veteran Stan Egerton of Burlington teared up as he remembered his father who had fought at Vimy, and two brothers killed in the conflict that followed.

    "I'd rather not say," the 91-year-old said when asked what he was thinking about as he looked up at the monument.

    Others, like high-school student Chloe McManus of East Hants, N.S., who had come to Vimy with several members of her history class, struggled to find the right words to express what Vimy meant to her.

    But others couldn't say enough, such as the citizens of the nearby French city of Arras, who were eager to show their appreciation.

    Vimy just one part of the larger Battle of Arras in April 1917, but also the most successful.

    During a ceremony in the city centre earlier in the day, Arras Mayor Frederic Leturque thanked Australia, Britain, New Zealand and South Africa for having fought during that larger battle.

    But he saved a special thanks for Canada, telling Trudeau and the hundreds of others assembled that the Canadians' actions at Vimy were "a turning point for our city and our country."
     
    Undeniable, BigSuzyB and Wafarer like this.
    1. Undeniable
      Interesting . My hat goes off to any and all of those from WW1 and WW2 . Both were such unnecessary conflicts that brave men and women didn't give a second thought to offering themselves in support of the good of mankind .
       
      Undeniable, Apr 11, 2017
    2. Mr Smith 36
      Good men do what good men must do...
       
      Mr Smith 36, Apr 21, 2017
  7. Undeniable

    Undeniable Porn Star

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    I will not sugarcoat this and just come out with it . Over the last 10 days there are approximately a dozen less hostiles here that will never take credit for anything ever again as far as causing terror to innocent civilians around the world.
    Officially it goes in the books as a support mission that was executed near flawlessly by the locals here that are being trained to defend their homeland after we are gone ! We are more than happy to give them the credit for cleaning house .
    How was your week ?;)
     
    angelforyou and Wafarer like this.
    1. Rixer
      Not as rewarding as yours apparently. Glad you are safe.
       
      Rixer, Apr 11, 2017
      Wafarer and Undeniable like this.
  8. Wafarer

    Wafarer Supreme Warlord

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    Hi there Ud, I thought you and others might enjoy this:

     
  9. Undeniable

    Undeniable Porn Star

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    The one thing that we can appreciate from that clip is the dedication and determination of those that fight for the cause and the good of the many . We do not need a constant reminder of that which we do daily with the hope that we will see the sun come up tomorrow . Thank you for thinking of us but this video hits a little too close to home to be of any comfort . Great musical score though .
    We have been dug in more than a few times with armaments passing over us and as much as they think they are right over us , we are in their house already and it rarely turns out well for them .
     
  10. Undeniable

    Undeniable Porn Star

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    All I ask of my CIC is that during one of his golfing excursions that he pause for a moment to deliver one simple line help is on the way !
    For every time tough talk is uttered our fighting intensifies here and people are dying , this is not a game people .
    I apologize for the abrupt tone but we are pissed off and some are scared and we need those men focused on fighting for us not fighting for their lives !
     
  11. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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    Undy You guys are simply not motivated.
     
    1. Mr Smith 36
      Damn Ficxa, your grasp of english is vastly improving...
       
      Mr Smith 36, Apr 21, 2017
    2. Ficxa 479
      What do you think I do here, I perfect my Eng.And of course keep you guys a company, you surely need a different view dont I.
       
      Ficxa 479, Apr 21, 2017
      Mr Smith 36 and msman like this.
  12. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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    So where r all those missin tamahowks?It seems that those Russians destroied them with a new laser gun.
     
    1. msman
      Who said there were any missing tomahawks?
       
      msman, Apr 21, 2017
  13. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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    Out of 59 launched only 23 got thier targets
     
    1. shootersa
      That was Russia's and Syria's story.
      Proven false, but what else is new?

      and by the way, Shooters new Matter Transformation Unit Trumps Russia's Laser gun. (pun intended)
      [​IMG]
       
      shootersa, Apr 21, 2017
    2. msman
      Who told you that?
       
      msman, Apr 21, 2017
  14. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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  15. shootersa

    shootersa Frisky Feline

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    Ficxa;
    Here is something for you!
     
    1. View previous comments...
    2. Ficxa 479
      That was fun
       
      Ficxa 479, Apr 21, 2017
    3. Mr Smith 36
      This may be the wrong thread to post this, but I think Undeniable would also agree. Wouldn't it be wonderful if man in his infinite wisdom would construct things that would further advance civilization, rather than construct weapons of destruction. Not that I'm unaware of the need for defense, just that it would behoove mankind to change their mindset. Have you noticed every popular game, movie, TV series is based on warfare or SOME kind of conflict between people. Crime shows or court cases appear to be big right now. What the hell is going on? Even here... conflict seems to be the name of the game. Even orca whales and dolphins work together, not against each other.
       
      Mr Smith 36, Apr 21, 2017
    4. shootersa
      Mr. Smith, Shooter just happens to agree with you.
      We should watch Big Bang Theory, which ironically isn't about violence at all.

      [​IMG]
       
      shootersa, Apr 21, 2017
    5. Mr Smith 36
      One of the best written shows on television! We love watching Sheldon and the gang. :)
       
      Mr Smith 36, Apr 22, 2017
    6. msman
      I think Sheldon is an idiot but I do enjoy looking at that little scientist girl.
       
      msman, Apr 22, 2017
  16. RandyKnight

    RandyKnight Have Gun, Will Travel

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    Then why did Ashad move all the rest of his planes to your airbase....
    he has abandoned his.....
     
    1. Ficxa 479
      Assad thinks that those 36 missin are still in an air
       
      Ficxa 479, Apr 21, 2017
    2. RandyKnight
      LOL
       
      RandyKnight, Apr 21, 2017
      Mr Smith 36 likes this.
  17. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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    Smithy You are wrong killer whales eat dolphins. The rest you said i personally agree with you. But it is rough times so rough methods. When do you guys did a step back to make a world a safer place. We gave away East Europe that bumper zone between NATO and Russia, What was it that you did NATO forfilled that space in the name of thier security> We told you we dont need them we trust yon just dont move close to us. But no NATO find every excuse to engulf another country.. So this time you wont cheat us, we gonna take back what belongs to us EAST EUROPE and to hell the conciquensies. Those who has nothing to lose scare of nothing. It is West Establishment who has luxury life should be worried. Huntin rules says whan you trap a beast and it has no way to escape GUESS what it does. It goes back on its persuer with all its might and to hell the rest.That s what many of us would do. But Putin has more wisdom he plays a pocker with a bad hand and he wins.
     
  18. M4MPetCock

    M4MPetCock Porn Star

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    Obama Was First President to Spend More on Welfare Than Defense


    1/20/17

    Barack Obama was the first president of the United States to spend more on “means-tested entitlements”—AKA welfare—than on national defense, according to data published by his own Office of Management and Budget.

    Historical tables that the OMB posted on the Obama White House website, include annual totals for both “national defense” spending and “means-tested entitlement” spending going back to fiscal 1962--which is three years before President Lyndon Johnson signed legislation creating the Medicaid program, a means-tested entitlement that together with the Children's Health Insurance Program enrolled 74,407,191 beneficiaries as of November 2016.

    In every year from fiscal 1962 through fiscal 2014, total national defense spending exceeded means-tested entitlement spending.

    [​IMG]

    In fiscal year 1962, for example, the federal government spent more than twelve times as much money on national defense ($52,345,000,000) as it did on means-test entitlements ($4,300,000,000).

    However, national defense spending peaked in 2011, when it hit $705,554,000,000. By contrast, means-tested entitlement spending has increased each year since 2012.

    Finally, in fiscal 2015, it exceeded national defense spending for the first time.

    In fiscal 2014, according to OMB Historical Table 3.2, “total national defense” spending was $603,457,000,000. That same year, according to OMB Historical Table 8.1, “means-tested entitlement” spending was $601,700,000,000.

    But in fiscal 2015, total national defense spending declined to $589,965,000,000 while means-tested entitlement spending climbed to $666,900,000,000. Thus, fiscal 2015 became the first year that means-tested entitlement spending—welfare spending--exceeded national defense spending.

    The fiscal 2016 numbers published in the OMB’s Historical Tables are estimates, but they show means-tested entitlements exceeding national defense spending $709,600,000,000 to $604,452,000,000.

    -------------------


    House approves $602B defense bill despite White House objections


    5/19/16

    The Republican-led House voted convincingly Wednesday to approve a $602 billion defense policy bill after rejecting attempts by Democrats to close the detention facility at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and to repeal the war powers President Barack Obama relies on to fight the Islamic State (ISIS).

    The legislation, which authorizes military spending for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, seeks to halt a decline in the combat readiness of the U.S. armed forces by purchasing more weapons and prohibiting further cuts in troop levels. But in a 17-page statement on the policy bill, the White House detailed its opposition to numerous provisions and said Obama would veto the legislation if it reached his desk.

    The Obama administration objected to a Republican plan to shift $18 billion in wartime spending to add additional ships, jet fighters, helicopters and other equipment the Pentagon didn't request.

    To make up for the shortfall in the wartime account, Obama's successor would submit a supplemental budget to Congress in early 2017, according to Thornberry, the plan's architect. He and other proponents of the spending increase say it is essential to halt a decline in the military's ability to respond to global threats -- which, they say, has worsened on Obama's watch.

    The House bill would block reductions in the number of active-duty troops by prohibiting the Army from falling below 480,000 active-duty soldiers and by adding 7,000 service members to the Air Force and Marine Corps. The legislation also approves a 2.1 percent pay raise for the troops -- a half-percentage point higher than the Pentagon asked for in its budget submission.

    The bill also includes a provision authored by Thornberry to curb what Republicans say is micromanagement of military operations by National Security Council staff. Thornberry said he has personally heard from troops in combat who have received intimidating calls from junior White House staffers even though their role is to coordinate policy and advise the president.
     
  19. Ficxa 479

    Ficxa 479 Porn Star

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  20. M4MPetCock

    M4MPetCock Porn Star

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